Whitby railway station

Last updated

Whitby
National Rail logo.svg
Whitby station (geograph 5359203).jpg
General information
Location Whitby, Scarborough
England
Coordinates 54°29′05″N0°36′55″W / 54.4848396°N 0.6151910°W / 54.4848396; -0.6151910
Grid reference NZ898108
Owned by Network Rail
Managed by Northern Trains
Platforms2
Tracks2
Other information
Station codeWTB
Classification DfT category F1
History
Original company Whitby and Pickering Railway
Pre-grouping North Eastern Railway
Post-grouping
Key dates
8 June 1835 (1835-06-08)Opened as Whitby
4 June 1847Resited
1886Renamed Whitby Town
1924Renamed Whitby
30 September 1951Renamed Whitby Town
5 September 1966Renamed Whitby
Passengers
2016/17Decrease2.svg 0.132 million
Preceding station Northern Trains.svg Northern Following station
Ruswarp
towards Middlesbrough via  Nunthorpe
Esk Valley Line Terminus
Listed Building – Grade II
FeatureOriginal York and North Midland Railway station buildingDesignated4 December 1972Reference no.1261393 [1] Location
North Yorkshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Whitby
Location in North Yorkshire, England
Notes
Passenger statistics from the Office of Rail and Road

Whitby is a railway station at the head of the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 6 miles 24 chains (10.1 km) east of Grosmont, serves the seaside town of Whitby, Borough of Scarborough in North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains. The station is also served by heritage services operated by the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

Contents

History

Tile map at the station, showing historic North Eastern Railway routes across North Yorkshire. Esk line tile map.jpg
Tile map at the station, showing historic North Eastern Railway routes across North Yorkshire.
The station, photographed in the 1970s, with all four platforms still in use. Whitby Town copy.jpg
The station, photographed in the 1970s, with all four platforms still in use.

Whitby's original railway station stood near to the end of the current platform, in the form of the offices, workshop and carriage shed of the Whitby and Pickering Railway; a single track horse worked line opened throughout in 1836. Its engineer was George Stephenson.

In 1845, the W&P was taken over by the York and North Midland Railway and converted into a double tracked, steam worked line. The Y&NM built the present Whitby station to the design of its architect George Townsend Andrews, who also designed the locomotive shed and the goods shed. Andrews' station included a fine 'Euston Truss' overall roof which was removed by British Railways in 1953 and replaced by the present awnings.

In 1854, the Y&NM helped form the North Eastern Railway, who later added two more platforms to help deal with traffic from the other branch lines that served Whitby; the Esk Valley Line finally opened throughout to a junction at Grosmont in 1865 while the coast line from Loftus opened in 1883 and from Scarborough in 1885. Block signalling replaced the time interval system in 1876 and brought Whitby an unusual three storey signal box to make it high enough to see over the adjacent goods shed.

In 1900, the NER authorised the installation of Tile Maps at 25 of their stations. Whitby is one of nine stations left to have their map still in situ and intact. The other eight are at Beverley, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Morpeth, Saltburn, Scarborough, Tynemouth and York. [2]

The NER became part of the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping of the railways in 1923 and the LNER became part of British Railways with the nationalisation of the railways in 1948. The only changes brought to Whitby were in locomotives, rolling stock and signalling; the basic structure remained unchanged.

The station was scheduled to be closed in the 1963 Beeching Report, which recommended the removal of all three lines serving the station. The route to York via Pickering and Malton was closed as scheduled, while the coast lines had gone by 1965. However the Esk Valley Line to Middlesbrough was kept open because of poor road access for replacement buses. [3]

With the closure of all but the Esk Valley Line, Whitby lost almost all of its staff. Over the following years the pickup goods train was withdrawn, the remaining double track as far as Grosmont was singled and the signal box closed and demolished, as was the goods shed. A run-round loop for excursion trains was retained and was used by the regular NYMR services from 2007 until 2014.

Platforms 3 and 4 were entirely removed and the site sold off, to be occupied by a supermarket. Platform 2 was cut back to what remains of the trainshed and its track removed, leaving only platform 1 rail served. Apart from the roofless and truncated station, Whitby's only other surviving railway buildings are the two track engine shed, originally built by the York and North Midland Railway and extended by the NER and the neglected remains of one of the pair of Whitby and Pickering Railway 1835 weighbridge houses.

In 2013, plans were approved for major development work around the station. This included the rebuilding and restoration of platform 2, to a somewhat longer length than the original. [4] [5] When the rebuilding of platform 2 was complete in 2014, the NYMR increased their service to four trains per day (five in peak periods) to and from Whitby. [4] [6] [7] In December 2019, Northern increased their services from four trains per day to six. [8]

Services

Northern Trains

As of the May 2021 timetable change, the station is served by six trains per day (four on Sunday) towards Middlesbrough via Nunthorpe. Most trains continue to Newcastle via Hartlepool. All services are operated by Northern Trains. [9]

Rolling stock used: Class 156 Super Sprinter and Class 158 Express Sprinter

North Yorkshire Moors Railway

The North Yorkshire Moors Railway operates heritage services between Pickering and Whitby via Grosmont. Services run daily from Easter until the end of October each year, with some additional services at other times of year.

Historic structures

Related Research Articles

North Yorkshire Moors Railway Heritage railway in North Yorkshire, England

The North Yorkshire Moors Railway (NYMR) is a heritage railway in North Yorkshire, England, that runs through the North York Moors National Park. First opened in 1836 as the Whitby and Pickering Railway, the railway was planned in 1831 by George Stephenson as a means of opening up trade routes inland from the then important seaport of Whitby. The line between Grosmont and Rillington was closed in 1965 and the section between Grosmont and Pickering was reopened in 1973 by the North York Moors Historical Railway Trust Ltd. The preserved line is now a tourist attraction and has been awarded several industry accolades.

Esk Valley line Railway line between Middlesbrough and Whitby, England

The Esk Valley Line is a railway line located in the north of England, covering a total distance of around 30 miles (48 km), running from Middlesbrough to Whitby. The line follows the course of the River Esk for much of its eastern half.

Battersby railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Battersby is a railway station on the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 11 miles 4 chains (17.8 km) south-east of Middlesbrough, serves the village of Battersby, Hambleton in North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains.

Castleton Moor railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Castleton Moor is a railway station on the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 16 miles 45 chains (26.7 km) west of Whitby, serves the village of Castleton, Scarborough in North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains.

Lealholm railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Lealholm is a railway station on the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 11 miles 40 chains (18.5 km) west of Whitby, serves the village of Lealholm, Scarborough in North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains.

Glaisdale railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Glaisdale is a railway station on the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 9 miles 33 chains (15.1 km) west of Whitby, serves the village of Glaisdale in North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains.

Grosmont railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Grosmont is a railway station on the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 6 miles 24 chains (10.1 km) west of Whitby, serves the village of Grosmont, in the Borough of Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains. The station is also served by heritage services operated by the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

Sleights railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Sleights is a railway station on the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 2 miles 78 chains (4.8 km) south-west of Whitby, serves the villages of Briggswath and Sleights, Scarborough in North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains.

Ruswarp railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Ruswarp is a railway station on the Esk Valley Line, which runs between Middlesbrough and Whitby via Nunthorpe. The station, situated 1 mile 30 chains (2.2 km) south-west of Whitby, serves the village of Ruswarp, Scarborough in North Yorkshire, England. It is owned by Network Rail and managed by Northern Trains.

Pickering railway station Heritage railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Pickering railway station is the southern terminus of the North Yorkshire Moors Railway and serves the town of Pickering in North Yorkshire, England. The first railway arrived in Pickering from the north in 1836, however, it wasn't until the railway was connected from the south in 1845, that the current station was built. The station was closed by British Railways in March 1965, but since 1975, the station has served as the southern terminus of the North York Moors Railway.

Levisham railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Levisham railway station is a station on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway and serves the village of Levisham in the North York Moors National Park, North Yorkshire, England.

Goathland railway station Railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Goathland railway station is a station on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway and serves the village of Goathland in the North York Moors National Park, North Yorkshire, England. It has also been used in numerous television and film productions. Holiday accommodation is available in the form of a camping coach.

Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway Disused railway line in Yorkshire, England

The Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway (WRMU), a.k.a. the Whitby–Loftus Line, was a railway line in North Yorkshire, England, built between 1871 and 1886, running from Loftus on the Yorkshire coast to the Esk at Whitby, and connecting Middlesbrough to Whitby along the coast.

Kettleness railway station Former railway station in the North Riding of Yorkshire, England

Kettleness was a railway station on the Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway from 1883 to 1958 serving the remote village of Kettleness. The main station building is still extant and serves as a scouting centre.

Hinderwell railway station Former railway station in the North Riding of Yorkshire, England

Hinderwell railway station was a railway station on the Whitby Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway. It was opened on 3 December 1883, and served the villages of Hinderwell and Runswick Bay. Like most stations on the line between Loftus and Whitby West Cliff, it was built with a passing loop. However, the northbound side was not furnished with a platform until 1908. The station closed to all traffic on 5 May 1958.

Staithes railway station Former railway station in the North Riding of Yorkshire, England

Staithes railway station was a railway station on the Whitby Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway, serving the villages of Staithes and Dalehouse in North Yorkshire, England. It was opened on 3 December 1883.

Whitby and Pickering Railway

The Whitby and Pickering Railway (W&P) was built to halt the gradual decline of the port of Whitby on the east coast of England. Its basic industries—whaling and shipbuilding—had been in decline and it was believed that opening transport links inland would help regenerate the town and port.

Beckhole railway station Disused railway station in North Yorkshire, England

Beckhole railway station was a railway station at Beck Hole in the North Yorkshire Moors on part of the original Whitby and Pickering Railway line. Although it was possible to travel to Beckhole in 1835, the station was opened in 1836, and closed to passengers permanently in 1914. Beckhole closed completely in 1951.

Grosmont Tunnel Railway tunnel in North Yorkshire, England

The Grosmont Tunnels are two separate railway tunnels adjoining each other in the village of Grosmont, North Yorkshire, England. The first tunnel was built in 1835 and has now become a pedestrian route through to the North York Moors Railway (NYMR) engine sheds on the south side of the hill.

Whitby engine shed Former railway locomotive depot in North Yorkshire, England

Whitby engine shed was a steam locomotive depot located at the south end of Whitby railway station in North Yorkshire, England. The shed was opened in 1847, extended in the 1860s, and closed in 1959, when the closure of lines and dieselisation of the routes from Whitby took hold. The shed building, which was grade II listed in 1991, still stands, being utilised for various enterprises, and is now used as holiday accommodation.

References

  1. Historic England. "Town Railway Station (1261393)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 10 February 2021.
  2. "North Eastern Tile Company > A Bit of History". northeasterntilecompany.co.uk. Retrieved 25 October 2015.
  3. "This is why most of Yorkshire's closed railways won't re-open under the 'reverse Beeching fund'". Yorkshire Post. 27 January 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2022.
  4. 1 2 "Funding Agreed For Second Platform at Whitby" (press release). North Yorkshire Moors Railway. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  5. "Work finally begins on second platform". Whitby Gazette. 4 March 2014. Retrieved 7 August 2014.
  6. Reed, James. "Moors Railway set for £2.8 m improvements". Yorkshire Post. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  7. "North Yorkshire Moors Railway's new platform opens". BBC News. BBC. 16 August 2014. Retrieved 17 August 2014.
  8. mcelwee, Jade (15 July 2019). "Whitby welcomes more trains - this will make a day trip to London and back possible for the first time". The Scarborougbh News. Retrieved 2 January 2020.
  9. "Train times: Middlesbrough to Whitby (Esk Valley Railway)" (PDF). Northern Trains . 16 May 2021. Retrieved 8 May 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

Further reading

Preceding station National Rail logo.svg National Rail Following station
Ruswarp   Northern Trains
Esk Valley Line
 Terminus
HR icon.svg   Heritage railways
Grosmont   North Yorkshire Moors Railway  Terminus
Disused railways
Whitby West Cliff   North Eastern Railway
Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway
 Terminus
This station offers access to the Cleveland Way
Distance to path
Next station anticlockwise Saltburn 19 miles
Next station clockwise Scarborough 21 miles