Han Chinese

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Han Chinese
汉族/漢族 or 汉人/漢人
Hanfu man and lady.jpg
Chinese couple wearing hanfu
Total population
1.4 billion [1]
Regions with significant populations
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  People's Republic of China 1,321,000,000 [2]
Flag of the Republic of China.svg  Republic of China (Taiwan) >22,000,000 [3] [4]
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 9,393,000
Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 6,910,000 (2022) [5]
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3,795,000-5,100,000 [6] [7]
Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia 3,200,000 [8]
Flag of Singapore.svg  Singapore 2,670,000 [9]
Flag of Myanmar.svg  Myanmar 1,638,000 [10]
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1,469,000 [11]
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 1,214,000 [12]
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 922,000 [13]
Flag of Vietnam.svg  Vietnam 823,000
Flag of France.svg  France 700,000
Flag of Venezuela.svg  Venezuela 450,000 [14]
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom 433,000 [15]
Flag of Peru.svg  Peru 376,000 [16]
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 350,000
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 334,000 [17]
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 231,000 [18]
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 212,000 [19]
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 210,000 [20] [note 1]
Flag of Cambodia.svg  Cambodia 210,000 [21]
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 200,000 [22] [23]
Flag of India.svg  India 189,000
Flag of Laos.svg  Laos 186,000
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 172,000 [24]
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 152,000
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 145,000
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 135,000
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 70,000 [25]
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 28,943 [26]
Flag of Costa Rica (state).svg  Costa Rica 19,000 [27]
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 11,000 [28]
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 3,984
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 3,500
Languages
Chinese
Religion
Predominantly Irreligious, Mahayana Buddhism, Chinese folk religion (including Taoism, ancestral worship, Confucianism and others), with minorities ascribing to Christianity, Islam (see Hui people), and other faiths [29]
Related ethnic groups
Sino-Tibetan peoples

Some sources refer to Han Chinese directly as "Chinese" or group them with other Sino-Tibetan peoples.
  1. Of the 710,000 Chinese nationals living in Korea in 2016, 500,000 are ethnic Koreans.
  2. Overseas Chinese include both Han and non-Han people (see overseas Chinese for related references).

Related Research Articles

Sui dynasty Dynasty that ruled over China from 581 to 618

The Sui dynasty was a short-lived imperial dynasty of China of pivotal significance (581-618). The Sui unified the Northern and Southern dynasties, thus ending the long period of division following the fall of the Western Jin Dynasty, and laying the foundations for the much longer lasting Tang dynasty.

Xiongnu Tribal confederation of nomadic Eurasian Steppe peoples

The Xiongnu were a tribal confederation of nomadic peoples who, according to ancient Chinese sources, inhabited the eastern Eurasian Steppe from the 3rd century BC to the late 1st century AD. Touman, who led Xiongnu 220-211 BCE, is the first known leader of the Xiongnu Empire.

Xianbei Para-Mongolic ancient people of Manchuria and Mongolia

The Xianbei were a Proto-Mongolic ancient nomadic people that once resided in the eastern Eurasian steppes in what is today Mongolia, Inner Mongolia, and Northeastern China. They originated from the Donghu people who splintered into the Wuhuan and Xianbei when they were defeated by the Xiongnu at the end of the 3rd century BC. The Xianbei were largely subordinate to larger nomadic powers and the Han dynasty until they gained prominence in 87 AD by killing the Xiongnu chanyu Youliu. However unlike the Xiongnu, the Xianbei political structure lacked the organization to pose a concerted challenge to the Chinese for most of their time as a nomadic people.

Hui people Ethnoreligious group of China

The Hui people are an East Asian ethnoreligious group predominantly composed of Chinese-speaking adherents of Islam. They are distributed throughout China, mainly in the northwestern provinces and in the Zhongyuan region. According to the 2011 census, China is home to approximately 10.5 million Hui people. The 110,000 Dungan people of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan are also considered part of the Hui ethnicity.

Chinese nobility Traditional social structure of Ancient China and Imperial China

The nobility of China was an important feature of the traditional social structure of Ancient China and Imperial China.

Chinese people Ethnic groups

The Chinese people or simply Chinese, are people or ethnic groups identified with China, usually through ethnicity, nationality, citizenship, or other affiliation.

Heqin, also known as marriage alliance, refers to the historical practice of Chinese monarchs marrying princesses—usually members of minor branches of the ruling family—to rulers of neighboring states. It was often adopted as an appeasement strategy with an enemy state that was too powerful to defeat on the battlefield. The policy was not always effective. It implied an equal diplomatic status between the two monarchs. As a result, it was controversial and had many critics.

Dynasties in Chinese history, or Chinese dynasties, were hereditary monarchical regimes that ruled over China during much of its history. From the inauguration of dynastic rule by Yu the Great in circa 2070 BC to the abdication of the Xuantong Emperor on 12 February 1912 in the wake of the Xinhai Revolution, China was ruled by a series of successive dynasties. Dynasties of China were not limited to those established by ethnic Han—the dominant Chinese ethnic group—and its predecessor, the Huaxia tribal confederation, but also included those founded by non-Han peoples.

Yamato people Ethnic group that inhabits Japan

The Yamato people or the Wajin are an East Asian ethnic group and a nation that inhabits the Japanese archipelago, descended partly from the indigenous Jōmon people and partly from the Yayoi people who arrived on the archipelago from around the third century.

History of Xinjiang

Xinjiang historically consisted of two main geographically, historically, and ethnically distinct regions with different historical names: Dzungaria north of the Tianshan Mountains; and the Tarim Basin south of the Tianshan Mountains, currently mainly inhabited by the Uyghurs. They were renamed Xinjiang in 1884, meaning "new frontier," when both regions were conquered by the Manchu Qing dynasty after the Dungan revolt (1862–1877).

Sixteen Prefectures Historical region in northern China

The Sixteen Prefectures comprise a historical region in northern China along the Great Wall in present-day Beijing, Tianjin, and northern Hebei and Shanxi.

Shatuo Medieval Turkic tribe that founded dynasties in China

The Shatuo, or the Shatuo Turks were a Turkic tribe that heavily influenced northern Chinese politics from the late ninth century through the tenth century. They are noted for founding three, Later Tang, Later Jin, and Later Han, of the five dynasties and one, Northern Han, of the ten kingdoms during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The short lived kingdoms founded by Shatuo Turks would later be conquered by the Song dynasty. After the Han Chinese conquest of Shatuo Turks, they mostly disappeared as an ethnic group.

Chinese clothing Traditional and modern dress in China

Chinese clothing describes both the traditional hanfu and modern variations of indigenous Chinese dress as recorded by the artifacts and traditional arts of Chinese culture. Chinese clothing has been shaped through its dynastic traditions, as well as through foreign influences. Chinese clothing showcases the traditional fashion sensibilities of Chinese culture traditions and forms one of the major cultural facets of Chinese civilization.

Liqian was a county established during the Western Han dynasty and located in the south of modern Yongchang County, Jinchang, in Gansu province of Northwest China. The Western Han inhabitants of the county had migrated to the area from western regions. The county was renamed Liqian (力乾) during the Northern Wei dynasty and disestablished during the Sui dynasty, becoming part of Fanhe County. There is a myth that some of the modern-day residents of Zhelaizhai are descendants of a group of Roman soldiers that were never accounted for after being captured in the Battle of Carrhae. However, eminent Chinese authorities, modern genetic studies, and archaeologists have debunked this theory.

The distinction between Huá and , also known as Sino–barbarian dichotomy, is a historical Chinese concept that differentiated a culturally defined "China" from cultural or ethnic outsiders. Although Yí is often translated as "barbarian", other translations of this term in English include "foreigners", "ordinary others" "wild tribes", and "uncivilised tribes". The Hua–Yi distinction asserted Chinese superiority, but implied that outsiders could become Hua by adopting Chinese values and customs. These concepts were not unique to the Chinese, but were also applied by the Vietnamese, Japanese and Koreans who all considered themselves at one point in history to be "Middle Kingdom" (Zhongguo) instead of China.

Invasion and rebellion of the Five Barbarians Rebellion of unsinicized peoples against the Jin dynasty

The Upheaval of the Five Barbarians also translated as the Rebellion, the Revolt, or the Invasion of the Five Barbarians is a Chinese expression referring to a series of rebellions and invasions between 304 and 316 by non-Han peoples, commonly called the Five Barbarians, living in North China against the Jin Empire, which had recently been weakened by a series of civil wars. The uprisings helped topple Emperor Huai of Jin in Luoyang and ended the Western Jin dynasty in northern China.

East Asian people are the people from East Asia, which consists of China, Taiwan, Japan, Mongolia, North Korea and South Korea. The total population of all countries within this region is estimated to be 1.677 billion and 21% of the world's population in 2020. However, large East Asian diasporas, such as the Chinese diaspora, Japanese diaspora, Korean diaspora and Mongol diaspora, as well as diasporas of other East Asian ethnic groups, mean that the 1.677 billion does not necessarily represent an accurate figure for the numbers of East Asian people worldwide.

The House of Li was the ruling house of the Western Liang dynasty and the Tang dynasty of China.

Vietnam under Chinese rule or Bắc thuộc refers to four historical periods when Vietnam was under the rule of various Chinese dynasties. Before this era, the Vietnamese were considered to be Proto-Viet-Muong before assimilation with various Chinese dynasties throughout history. Bắc thuộc is traditionally considered to have started in 111 BC, when the Han dynasty conquered Nanyue and lasted after the fall of the Tang dynasty in the 10th century. A fourth, relatively brief, 20-year rule by the Ming dynasty during the 15th century is usually excluded by historians in their discussion of the main, almost continuous, period of Chinese rule from 111 BC to AD 939.

Li (surname 李) Chinese surname

Li or Lee is a common Chinese surname, it is the 4th name listed in the famous Hundred Family Surnames. Li is one of the most common surnames in Asia, shared by 92.76 million people in China, and more than 100 million in Asia. It is the second most common surname in China as of 2018, the second most common surname in Hong Kong, and the 5th most common surname in Taiwan, where it is usually romanized as Lee.

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Further reading

Han Chinese
Simplified Chinese 汉族
Traditional Chinese 漢族
Literal meaning Han ethnic group

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