ICD-10 Chapter II: Neoplasms

Last updated
International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision
Chapter Blocks Title
I A00–B99 Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
II C00–D48 Neoplasms
III D50–D89 Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism
IV E00–E90 Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
V F00–F99 Mental and behavioural disorders
VI G00–G99 Diseases of the nervous system
VII H00–H59 Diseases of the eye and adnexa
VIII H60–H95 Diseases of the ear and mastoid process
IX I00–I99 Diseases of the circulatory system
X J00–J99 Diseases of the respiratory system
XI K00–K93 Diseases of the digestive system
XII L00–L99 Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue
XIII M00–M99 Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
XIV N00–N99 Diseases of the genitourinary system
XV O00–O99 Pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium
XVI P00–P96 Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
XVII Q00–Q99 Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities
XVIII R00–R99 Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
XIX S00–T98 Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes
XX V01–Y98 External causes of morbidity and mortality
XXI Z00–Z99 Factors influencing health status and contact with health services
XXII U00–U99 Codes for special purposes

ICD-10 is an international statistical classification used in health care and related industries.

ICD-10 is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), a medical classification list by the World Health Organization (WHO). It contains codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases. Work on ICD-10 began in 1983, became endorsed by the Forty-third World Health Assembly in 1990, and was first used by member states in 1994.

Medical classification, or medical coding, is the process of transforming descriptions of medical diagnoses and procedures into universal medical code numbers. The diagnoses and procedures are usually taken from a variety of sources within the health care record, such as the transcription of the physician's notes, laboratory results, radiologic results, and other sources.

Health care Prevention of disease and promotion of wellbeing

Health care or healthcare is the maintenance or improvement of health via the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, illness, injury, and other physical and mental impairments in people. Health care is delivered by health professionals in allied health fields. Physicians and physician associates are a part of these health professionals. Dentistry, midwifery, nursing, medicine, optometry, audiology, pharmacy, psychology, occupational therapy, physical therapy and other health professions are all part of health care. It includes work done in providing primary care, secondary care, and tertiary care, as well as in public health.

Contents

Produced by the World Health Organization, it is used in several countries around the world. Some have gone on to develop their own national enhancements, building off the international version of the classification.

World Health Organization Specialised agency of the United Nations

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organisation, was an agency of the League of Nations.

Chapter II of ICD-10 deals with neoplastic conditions; such as cancer, carcinoma in situ, and benign tumours. Precancerous conditions, for example vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia are classified to the body system chapter.

Cancer disease of uncontrolled, unregulated and abnormal cell growth

Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. These contrast with benign tumors, which do not spread. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss and a change in bowel movements. While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they can also have other causes. Over 100 types of cancers affect humans.

Carcinoma <i>in situ</i> carcinoma that is an early development defined by the absence of invasion of surrounding tissues

Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is a group of abnormal cells. While they are a form of neoplasm, there is disagreement over whether CIS should be classified as cancer. This controversy also depends on the exact CIS in question. Some authors do not classify them as cancer, however, recognizing that they can potentially become cancer. Others classify certain types as a non-invasive form of cancer. The term "pre-cancer" has also been used.

Benign tumor disease of cellular proliferation that results in abnormal growths in the body which lack the ability to metastasize

A benign tumor is a mass of cells (tumor) that lacks the ability to invade neighboring tissue or metastasize. These do not spread into, or invade, nearby tissues; however, they can sometimes be quite large. When removed, benign tumors usually do not grow back, whereas malignant tumors sometimes do. Unlike most benign tumors elsewhere in the body, benign brain tumors can be life threatening. Benign tumors generally have a slower growth rate than malignant tumors and the tumor cells are usually more differentiated. They are typically surrounded by an outer surface or remain with the epithelium. Common examples of benign tumors include moles and uterine fibroids.

The code set within Chapter II has been further enhanced by the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O) stand-alone classification.

The International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O) is a domain-specific extension of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems for tumor diseases. This classification is widely used by cancer registries.

C00–D48 – Neoplasms

(C00–C14) Malignant neoplasms, lip, oral cavity and pharynx

Oral cancer gastrointestinal system cancer that is located in the oral cavity

Oral cancer, also known as mouth cancer, is cancer of the lining of the lips, mouth, or upper throat. In the mouth, it most commonly starts as a painless white patch, that thickens, develops red patches, an ulcer, and continues to grow. When on the lips, it commonly looks like a persistent crusting ulcer that does not heal, and slowly grows. Other symptoms may include difficult or painful swallowing, new lumps or bumps in the neck, a swelling in the mouth, or a feeling of numbness in the mouth or lips.

Head and neck cancer organ system cancer that arises in the head or neck region (including the nasal cavity, sinuses, lips, mouth, salivary glands, throat, or larynx)

Head and neck cancer is a group of cancers that starts in the mouth, nose, throat, larynx, sinuses, or salivary glands. Symptoms for head and neck cancer may include a lump or sore that does not heal, a sore throat that does not go away, trouble swallowing, or a change in the voice. There may also be unusual bleeding, facial swelling, or trouble breathing.

(C15–C26) Malignant neoplasms, digestive organs

Esophageal cancer gastrointestinal system cancer that is located in the esophagus

Esophageal cancer is cancer arising from the esophagus—the food pipe that runs between the throat and the stomach. Symptoms often include difficulty in swallowing and weight loss. Other symptoms may include pain when swallowing, a hoarse voice, enlarged lymph nodes ("glands") around the collarbone, a dry cough, and possibly coughing up or vomiting blood.

Stomach cancer gastrointestinal system cancer that is located in the stomach

Stomach cancer, also known as gastric cancer, is a cancer which develops from the lining of the stomach. Early symptoms may include heartburn, upper abdominal pain, nausea and loss of appetite. Later signs and symptoms may include weight loss, yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes, vomiting, difficulty swallowing and blood in the stool among others. The cancer may spread from the stomach to other parts of the body, particularly the liver, lungs, bones, lining of the abdomen and lymph nodes.

Pylorus anatomical organ that connects the stomach to the duodenum

The pylorus, or pyloric part, connects the stomach to the duodenum. The pylorus is considered as having two parts, the pyloric antrum and the pyloric canal. The pyloric canal ends as the pyloric orifice, which marks the junction between the stomach and the duodenum. The orifice is surrounded by a sphincter, a band of muscle, called the pyloric sphincter. The word pylorus comes from Greek πυλωρός, via Latin. The word pylorus in Greek means "gatekeeper", related to "gate" and is thus linguistically related to the word "pylon".

(C30–C39) Malignant neoplasms, respiratory system and intrathoracic organs

(C40–C41) Malignant neoplasms, bone and articular cartilage

(Note: ICD-10 and ICD-O topography codes are usually the same, but C42 is used in ICD-O but not ICD-10.) [1]

(C43–C44) Malignant neoplasms, skin

(C45–C49) Malignant neoplasms, connective and soft tissue

(Alphanumeric subcodes are ILDS.)

(C50–C58) Malignant neoplasms, breast and female genital organs

(C60–C63) Malignant neoplasms of male genital organs

(C64–C68) Malignant neoplasms, urinary organs

(C69–C72) Malignant neoplasms, eye, brain and central nervous system

(C76–C80) Malignant neoplasms, secondary and ill-defined

(C97) Malignant neoplasms of independent (primary) multiple sites

(D00–D09) In situ neoplasms

(D10–D36) Benign neoplasms

(D37–D48) Neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behaviour

See also

Related Research Articles

Adenocarcinoma carcinoma that has material basis in abnormally proliferating cells, derives from epithelial cells, which originate in glandular tissue

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancerous tumor that can occur in several parts of the body. It is defined as neoplasia of epithelial tissue that has glandular origin, glandular characteristics, or both. Adenocarcinomas are part of the larger grouping of carcinomas, but are also sometimes called by more precise terms omitting the word, where these exist. Thus invasive ductal carcinoma, the most common form of breast cancer, is adenocarcinoma but does not use the term in its name—however, esophageal adenocarcinoma does to distinguish it from the other common type of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Several of the most common forms of cancer are adenocarcinomas, and the various sorts of adenocarcinoma vary greatly in all their aspects, so that few useful generalizations can be made about them.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia Human disease

The term multiple endocrine neoplasia encompasses several distinct syndromes featuring tumors of endocrine glands, each with its own characteristic pattern. In some cases, the tumors are malignant, in others, benign. Benign or malignant tumors of nonendocrine tissues occur as components of some of these tumor syndromes.

This is a list of terms related to oncology. The original source for this list was the US National Cancer Institute's public domain Dictionary of Cancer Terms.

Surface epithelial-stromal tumor ovarian tumor that is derived_from ovarian surface epithelium

Surface epithelial-stromal tumors are a class of ovarian neoplasms that may be benign or malignant. Neoplasms in this group are thought to be derived from the ovarian surface epithelium or from ectopic endometrial or Fallopian tube (tubal) tissue. Tumors of this type are also called ovarian adenocarcinoma. This group of tumors accounts for 90% to 95% of all cases of ovarian cancer. Serum CA-125 is often elevated but is only 50% accurate so it is not a useful tumor marker to assess the progress of treatment.

Neoplasm abnormal mass of tissue as a result of abnormal growth or division of cells

A neoplasm is a type of abnormal and excessive growth, called neoplasia, of tissue. The growth of a neoplasm is uncoordinated with that of the normal surrounding tissue, and it persists growing abnormally, even if the original trigger is removed. This abnormal growth usually forms a mass. When it forms a mass, it may be called a tumor.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 autosomal dominant disease that has material basis in a mutation in the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene and is characterized by over active endocrine glands frequently involving tumors of the parathyroid glands, the pituitary gland, and the pancreas

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is part of a group of disorders, the multiple endocrine neoplasias, that affect the endocrine system through development of neoplastic lesions in pituitary, parathyroid gland and pancreas.

Eye neoplasm sensory system cancer located in the eye that is characterized by uncontrolled cellular proliferation in the eye

Eye neoplasms can affect all parts of the eye, and can be a benign tumor or a malignant tumor (cancer). Eye cancers can be primary or metastatic cancer. The two most common cancers that spread to the eye from another organ are breast cancer and lung cancer. Other less common sites of origin include the prostate, kidney, thyroid, skin, colon and blood or bone marrow.

An adrenal tumor or adrenal mass is any benign or malignant neoplasms of the adrenal gland, several of which are notable for their tendency to overproduce endocrine hormones. Adrenal cancer is the presence of malignant adrenal tumors, and includes neuroblastoma, adrenocortical carcinoma and some adrenal pheochromocytomas. Most adrenal pheochromocytomas and all adrenocortical adenomas are benign tumors, which do not metastasize or invade nearby tissues, but may cause significant health problems by unbalancing hormones.

Salivary gland tumour human disease

Salivary gland tumours or neoplasms are tumours that form in the tissues of salivary glands. The salivary glands are classified as major or minor. The major salivary glands consist of the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands. The minor salivary glands consist of 800-1000 small mucus-secreting glands located throughout the lining of the oral cavity.

International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), for medical coding and reporting in the United States. The ICD-10-CM is a morbidity classification for classifying diagnoses and reason for visits in all American health care settings. The ICD-10-CM is based on the ICD-10, the statistical classification of disease published by the World Health Organization (WHO) which replaces ICD-9.

Pancreatic serous cystadenoma human disease

Pancreatic serous cystadenoma a benign tumour of pancreas. It is usually found in the tail of the pancreas, and may be associated with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

The International Classification of Childhood Cancer (ICCC) is a standardized method for categorizing childhood malignancies set forth by the World Health Organization (WHO). This system bases malignancy classification on the histological traits of the tumor. This is opposed to the classification of adult malignancies, which are categorized according to the primary tumor site. The latest iteration of the ICCC is ICD-O-3/WHO 2008, which was updated to reflect hematopoietic codes.

Vulvar tumors are those neoplasms of the vulva. Vulvar and vaginal neoplasms make up a small percentage (3%) of female genital cancers. They can be benign or malignant. Vulvar neoplasms are divided into cystic or solid lesions and other mixed types. Vulvar cancers are those malignant neoplasms that originate from vulvar epithelium, while vulvar sarcomas develop from non-epithelial cells such as bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels, or other connective or supportive tissue. Epithelial and mesenchymal tissue are the origin of vulvar tumors.

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