South Yuba River State Park

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South Yuba River State Park
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A waterfall on the South Fork Yuba River in South Yuba River State Park
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Location Nevada County, California, United States
Coordinates 39°17′30″N121°11′40″W / 39.29167°N 121.19444°W / 39.29167; -121.19444 Coordinates: 39°17′30″N121°11′40″W / 39.29167°N 121.19444°W / 39.29167; -121.19444
Area11,000 acres (45 km2)
Governing body California Department of Parks and Recreation

South Yuba River State Park is located along the South Fork of the Yuba River in the Sierra Nevada, within Nevada County, in Northern California.

Contents

Geography

The park's 22 miles (35 km) portion of the South Yuba River Canyon stretches from Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park downstream to Bridgeport, where the visitor center and Bridgeport Covered Bridge are located.

The park protects over 11,000 acres (44.5 km²), with 2,000 acres (8 km²) by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, and 9,000 acres (36 km²) by the federal Tahoe National Forest.

The park is accessed from Highway 20 west of Grass Valley or from Highway 49 north of Nevada City.

The Bridgeport Covered Bridge on the South Fork Yuba River in South Yuba River State Park Bridgeport covered bridge Nevada County CA.jpg
The Bridgeport Covered Bridge on the South Fork Yuba River in South Yuba River State Park

Park features

The park is noted for:

See also

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