Solar eclipse of February 15, 1961

Last updated
Solar eclipse of February 15, 1961
SE1961Feb15T.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureTotal
Gamma 0.883
Magnitude 1.036
Maximum eclipse
Duration165 sec (2 m 45 s)
Coordinates 47°24′N40°00′E / 47.4°N 40°E / 47.4; 40
Max. width of band258 km (160 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse8:19:48
References
Saros 120 (58 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000) 9422

A total solar eclipse occurred on February 15, 1961. Totality was visible from France, Monaco, Italy, San Marino, SFR Yugoslavia (parts now belonging to Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia and Kosovo, North Macedonia), Albania, Bulgaria including the capital city Sofia, Romania including the capital city Bucharest, and the Soviet Union (parts now belonging to Ukraine, Russia and Kazakhstan). The maximum eclipse was recorded near Novocherkassk (Russian SFSR).

Contents

This was the 51st of 55 umbral eclipses in Solar Saros 120.

Upcoming 4 umbral eclipses

52. 1979 February 26

53. 1997 March 9

54. 2015 March 20

55. 2033 March 30

In culture

The crucifixion scene in the 1961 film Barabbas was shot during this eclipse. [1]

Solar eclipses of 1961–1964

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit. [2]

Saros 120

This eclipse is a part of Saros cycle 120, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, containing 71 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on May 27, 933 AD, and reached an annular eclipse on August 11, 1059. It was a hybrid event for 3 dates: May 8, 1510, through May 29, 1546, and total eclipses from June 8, 1564, through March 30, 2033. The series ends at member 71 as a partial eclipse on July 7, 2195. The longest duration of totality was 2 minutes, 50 seconds on March 9, 1997. All eclipses in this series occurs at the Moon’s descending node.

Metonic series

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.

See also

Notes

  1. Elley, Derek (2013). The Epic Film: Myth and History. Routledge. p. 94. ISBN   9781317928874.
  2. van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

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References