Pandemic fatigue

Last updated
Crowds that go against the advice of health officials can be seen during pandemic fatigue. Here, shoppers visit a shopping district in Tokyo despite a stay-at-home advisory during the COVID-19 pandemic. Kichijoji Sun Road shopping street with stay-at-home advisory.jpg
Crowds that go against the advice of health officials can be seen during pandemic fatigue. Here, shoppers visit a shopping district in Tokyo despite a stay-at-home advisory during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Pandemic fatigue is the state of being worn out by recommended precautions and restrictions relating to a pandemic, often due to the length of the restrictions and lack of activities for one to engage in, resulting in boredom, depression, psychic numbing, and other issues, thereby leading one to abandoning these precautions and risk catching the disease. [1] Pandemic fatigue can be responsible for an increased number of cases. [2]

Contents

Influences

Social norms

Social norms can have an effect on pandemic fatigue. [3]

Political distrust

Political distrust can have an effect on pandemic fatigue as well. "Crisis fatigue" is the idea the public has become immune to warnings from politicians and distrustful of their claims. [4] The public has been exposed to several crises in the past two decades, including SARS in 2003, bird flu in 2005, swine flu in 2009, MERS in 2012, Ebola in 2014 and currently COVID-19 in 2020-2021. [5] Because of this, some people find it hard to trust political officials and their suggestions on how to treat and manage COVID-19. [6]

Response

Epidemiologist Julia Marcus wrote that indefinite abstention from all social contact was not a sustainable way to contain a pandemic. Drawing from lessons in HIV prevention, she advised a principle of harm reduction rather than an "all-or-nothing approach" in controlling the COVID-19 pandemic. [7]

Lockdowns

With many countries having a rise in new cases from Variants of SARS-CoV-2, more waves of lockdowns have been put in effect. Countries like the UK have been put back into COVID-19 lockdowns and due to this, many citizens there have been in this state of fatigue and exhaustion. Studies show that people are finding it harder to stay positive, with 60% of citizens in the UK saying they are finding it harder to stay positive daily compared to before the pandemic – an 8-point increase. [8]

Coping methods

One of the major ways with coping with pandemic fatigue is limiting the amount of time you spend on your device. Justin Ross, a psychologist who studies the effects of pandemic fatigue, states that "Doomscrolling, or purposely tuning in to negative stories on TV or on social media, fuels increased dread, uncertainty, anxiety, and fatigue." [9] Another method he found to be very useful in his studies was being active. "If you make movement a priority, you will find a way to make it happen. Prioritizing time to exercise and meditate by putting it in your schedule and protecting that time is going to make a huge difference in your mental health". Other forms of coping include meditation and finding time for yourself to reflect.

COVID-19 pandemic

A pair of fuck covid running socks. Fuck covid running socks.jpg
A pair of fuck covid running socks.

COVID fatigue is the state of being worn out about the precautionary measures and the threat of COVID-19. Anxiety from the threat of losing economic security and catching the disease both play a part in the feeling of fatigue in people. COVID fatigue has caused people to not follow precautionary guidelines, increasing their risk of catching the virus. [10] Many people are tired of the lockdowns, and not having a normal routine. [11] [12] Higher levels of alcohol and drug use also contribute to the feeling of tiredness. [13]

As lockdowns were lifted in many parts of the world, some people started to ignore stay-at-home orders. People went to bars and restaurants, ultimately causing the disease to spread faster. [14]

Zoom fatigue

Zoom fatigue is described as tiredness, anxiety, or worry resulting from overusing virtual videoconferencing platforms. [15] Evidence suggests that being on Zoom calls limits the amount of nonverbal cues our brains pick up in face-to-face interactions. The lack of these cues causes our brains to subconsciously exert more energy, making us feel more irritable and exhausted after video calls are over. Other issues of Zoom include the fact that we are staring at a screen with peoples faces a couple feet away. This leads to a sense of danger and although our body knows we are in a safe place, our mind is on high alert. [15] Treatment for Zoom fatigue is fairly easy. Being able to connect with friends and family over technology that allows for these nonverbal cues (such as VR) works wonders. VR allows for "avatars" to interact with each other and gives the user the sensation that they are actually there, while still maintaining safe distances during lockdowns.[ citation needed ]

See also

Related Research Articles

Fitness game, exergaming or exer-gaming, or gamercising is a term used for video games that are also a form of exercise. Exergaming relies on technology that tracks body movement or reaction. The genre has been credited with upending the stereotype of gaming as a sedentary activity, and promoting an active lifestyle. Exergames are seen as evolving from technology changes aimed at making video games more fun.

Elbow bump type of informal greeting

The elbow bump is an informal greeting where two people touch elbows. Interest in this greeting was renewed during the avian flu scare of 2006, the 2009 swine flu pandemic, the Ebola outbreak of 2014, and the COVID-19 pandemic when health officials supported its use as an alternative to hand-shaking to reduce the spread of germs. During the latter pandemic, authorities advised that even an elbow bump was too risky, and suggested greeting from a distance.

Social distancing Infection control technique by keeping a distance from each other

In public health, social distancing, also called physical distancing, is a set of non-pharmaceutical interventions or measures intended to prevent the spread of a contagious disease by maintaining a physical distance between people and reducing the number of times people come into close contact with each other. It usually involves keeping a certain distance from others and avoiding gathering together in large groups.

COVID-19 pandemic Ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identified in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December 2019; a lockdown in Wuhan and other cities in surrounding Hubei failed to contain the outbreak, and it quickly spread to other parts of mainland China and around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. Multiple variants of the virus have emerged and become dominant in many countries since 2021, with the Alpha, Beta, and Delta variants being the most virulent. As of 20 October 2021, more than 241 million cases and 4.91 million deaths have been confirmed, making it one of the deadliest pandemics in history.

Social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic Indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has had far-reaching consequences beyond the spread of the disease itself and efforts to quarantine it, including political, cultural, and social implications.

COVID-19 pandemic in Guernsey Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Guernsey

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Bailiwick of Guernsey is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The Bailiwick has been successful in limiting and preventing the spread of the virus through a rigorous system of testing, tracing and isolating suspected and confirmed cases and requiring arrivals to self-isolate for 14 days. The States of Guernsey co-ordinates the pandemic response which has been praised for its transparency and clarity and held up as an exemplar of good communication.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Eritrea is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have reached Eritrea on 21 March 2020. The government introduced strict social distancing measures by end of March 2020 which was enforced until April 2021. In April 2021 the government relaxed the lockdown and restrictions and opened up schools, resumed commercial flights and public transportation. Wearing mask and social distancing guidelines are still in place. At the time of this writing there were a total of 6224 confirmed cases with 5800 recovering fully and 24 fatalities.

COVID-19 pandemic in the Bahamas Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in the Bahamas

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Bahamas is part of the COVID-19 pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The outbreak was identified in Wuhan, Hubei, China, in December 2019, declared to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and recognised as a pandemic by the World Health Organization on 11 March 2020. It was confirmed to have reached the Bahamas on 15 March 2020 with the announcement of the first case.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on social media Aspect of viral outbreak

During a time of social distance and limited contact with others, social media became an important place to interact. Social media platforms are meant to connect people and helped the world remain connected, largely increasing usage during the pandemic. Since many people are asked to remain home, they have turned to social media to maintain their relationships and to access entertainment to pass the time.

Anders Tegnell Swedish physician and civil servant

Nils Anders Tegnell is a Swedish civil servant and physician specialising in infectious disease. He is the current state epidemiologist of Sweden.

Mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic Psychological aspect of viral outbreak

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the mental health of people around the world. Similar to the past respiratory viral epidemics, such as the SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and the influenza epidemics, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in different population groups, including the healthcare workers, general public, and the patients and quarantined individuals. The Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee of the United Nations recommends that the core principles of mental health support during an emergency are "do no harm, promote human rights and equality, use participatory approaches, build on existing resources and capacities, adopt multi-layered interventions and work with integrated support systems." COVID-19 is affecting people's social connectedness, their trust in people and institutions, their jobs and incomes, as well as imposing a huge toll in terms of anxiety and worry.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the LGBT community Impact of COVID-19 on the LGBTQ+ community

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted inequities experienced by marginalized populations, and has had a significant impact on the LGBT community. Gay pride events were cancelled or postponed worldwide. More than 220 gay pride celebrations around the world were canceled or postponed in 2020, and in response a Global Pride event was hosted online.. LGBTQ+ people also tend to be more likely to have pre-existing health conditions, such as asthma, HIV/AIDS, cancer, or obesity, that would worsen their chances of survival if they became infected with COVID-19. They are also more likely to smoke.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on hospitals Consequences of COVID-19 pandemic for hospitals

The COVID-18 pandemic has impacted hospitals around the world. Many hospitals have scaled back or postponed non-emergency care. This has medical consequences for the people served by the hospitals, and it has financial consequences for the hospitals. Health and social systems across the globe are struggling to cope. The situation is especially challenging in humanitarian, fragile and low-income country contexts, where health and social systems are already weak. Health facilities in many places are closing or limiting services. Services to provide sexual and reproductive health care risk being sidelined, which will lead to higher maternal mortality and morbidity. The pandemic also resulted in the imposition of COVID-18 vaccine mandates in places such as California and New York for all public workers, including hospital staff.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare workers

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted healthcare workers physically and psychologically. Healthcare workers are more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection than the general population due to frequent contact with infected individuals. Healthcare workers have been required to work under stressful conditions without proper protective equipment, and make difficult decisions involving ethical implications. Health and social systems across the globe are struggling to cope. The situation is especially challenging in humanitarian, fragile and low-income country contexts, where health and social systems are already weak. Services to provide sexual and reproductive health care risk being sidelined, which will lead to higher maternal mortality and morbidity.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on other health issues Health consequences of outbreak beyond the COVID-19 disease itself

The COVID-19 pandemic has had many impacts on global health beyond those caused by the COVID-19 disease itself. It has led to a reduction in hospital visits for other reasons. There have been 38 per cent fewer hospital visits for heart attack symptoms in the United States and 40 per cent fewer in Spain. The head of cardiology at the University of Arizona said, "My worry is some of these people are dying at home because they're too scared to go to the hospital." There is also concern that people with strokes and appendicitis are not seeking timely treatment. Shortages of medical supplies have impacted people with various conditions.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children Overview of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children

A systematic review notes that children with COVID-19 have milder effects and better prognoses than adults. However, children are susceptible to "multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children" (MIS-C), a rare but life-threatening systemic illness involving persistent fever and extreme inflammation following exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Doomscrolling or Doomsurfing is the act of spending an excessive amount of screen time devoted to the absorption of negative news. Increased consumption of predominantly negative news may result in harmful psychophysiological responses in some.

Great Barrington Declaration COVID-19-related open letter

The Great Barrington Declaration is a statement advocating an alternative approach to the COVID-19 pandemic which involves "Focused Protection" of those most at risk and seeks to avoid or minimize the societal harm of the COVID-19 lockdowns. Authored by Sunetra Gupta of the University of Oxford, Jay Bhattacharya of Stanford University, and Martin Kulldorff of Harvard University, it was drafted at the American Institute for Economic Research in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, and signed there on 4 October 2020.

COVID-19 pandemic in popular culture References to the COVID-19 pandemic in popular culture

References to the COVID-19 pandemic in popular culture began while the pandemic was still underway. Despite the ravaging effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, it brought people together through modes of entertainment that facilitated the growth and development of pop culture.

Zoom fatigue is tiredness, worry or burnout associated with the overuse of virtual platforms of communication, particularly videoconferencing. The name derives from the cloud based videoconferencing and online chat software Zoom, even if it used to refer to non-Zoom video conferencing platforms.

References

  1. Barnett, Stacy Meichtry, Joanna Sugden and Andrew (October 26, 2020). "Pandemic Fatigue Is Real—And It's Spreading". Wall Street Journal via www.wsj.com.
  2. "U.S. Surgeon General Blames 'Pandemic Fatigue' For Recent COVID-19 Surge". NPR.org.
  3. Maddock, Jay. "Has pandemic fatigue set in? Here's why you might have it". CNN. Retrieved 2021-03-11.
  4. "Coronavirus and the politics of crisis fatigue | The Conversation".
  5. "WHO | Disease outbreaks by year". WHO. Retrieved 2021-05-06.
  6. Kriner, Sarah Kreps and Douglas L. (2020-10-30). "Will Americans trust a COVID-19 vaccine? Not if politicians tell them to". Brookings. Retrieved 2021-05-06.
  7. Marcus, Julia (11 May 2020). "Quarantine Fatigue Is Real". The Atlantic. Retrieved 15 November 2020.
  8. "'Pandemic burnout' on rise as latest Covid lockdowns take toll | The Guardian". 5 February 2021.
  9. "Are you feeling exhausted, anxious or sad? 5 tips for handling 'pandemic fatigue.' | uchealth". 30 October 2020.
  10. "'COVID Fatigue' and How to Fight It | AMITA Health Blog". www.amitahealth.org. Retrieved 2020-11-25.
  11. Koplon, Savannah. "How to overcome COVID-19 fatigue". UAB News. Retrieved 2020-11-25.
  12. Marketing, UC Davis Health, Public Affairs and. ""COVID fatigue" is hitting hard. Fighting it is hard, too, says UC Davis Health psychologist". health.ucdavis.edu. Retrieved 2020-11-25.
  13. Authority, University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics. "Managing COVID Fatigue is Crucial to Our Health and Wellbeing During the Pandemic". UW Health. Retrieved 2020-11-25.
  14. "How to fight 'Covid fatigue' as America heads for a deadly winter". the Guardian. 2020-11-22. Retrieved 2020-11-25.
  15. 1 2 Wiederhold, Brenda K. (18 June 2020). "Connecting Through Technology During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic: Avoiding "Zoom Fatigue" | Cyberpsychology". Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. 23 (7): 437–438. doi: 10.1089/cyber.2020.29188.bkw . PMID   32551981. S2CID   219920279.