COVID-19 pandemic in Nunavut

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in Nunavut
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location Nunavut, Canada
First outbreak Wuhan, Hubei, China
Index case Sanikiluaq
Arrival dateNovember 6, 2020
DateNovember 13, 2021
Confirmed cases674 [1]
Active cases0 [1]
Recovered670 [1]
Deaths
4
Government website
Nunavut Government
COVID sign at one of the local stores in Cambridge Bay Covid sign store Cambridge Bay 1.jpg
COVID sign at one of the local stores in Cambridge Bay

The COVID-19 pandemic in Nunavut is an ongoing viral pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Contents

Until November 6, 2020, Nunavut remained the only province or territory in Canada, and the only place in North America, that had not yet recorded a confirmed case of COVID-19, [2] [3] with two early presumptive cases later ruled to be false positives, [4] [5] and clusters of cases at mines in September and October involving employees flown in from outside of the territory. [6] [7] [8] [9]

On November 6, 2020, Nunavut recorded its first confirmed case of COVID-19 in-territory. [10] By mid-November, evidence of community transmission began to emerge, prompting the territory to reimplement restrictions in the affected communities. Nunavut's Chief Medical Officer Michael Patterson announced on November 16 that a territory-wide lockdown would take effect on November 18, reinstating the closure of schools and all non-essential businesses for at least two weeks. [11]

In May 2021, the Mary River Mine in the Qikiqtaaluk Region of Baffin Island announced an outbreak, with over 100 employees testing positive for COVID-19. Most of these cases included the Delta variant, a highly transmissible variant of the virus. When the mine shut down operations for May, it sent many workers to their southern home communities, which has led to the variant spreading to several provinces. [12] [13] [14]

Timeline

On January 28, 2020, Nunavut's Chief Medical Officer, Michael Patterson, stated that he had been monitoring the COVID-19 outbreak, and was "liaising with all of our counterparts, including federal and territorial public health experts and communicable disease experts." Patterson stated that Nunavut's Department of Health was making preparations for a possible outbreak within the territory, including educating staff on personal protective equipment and testing procedures. [15]

Patterson felt that the risk of COVID-19 reaching the territory was "very small," as the territory is only accessible by air travel, and that there was not much travel between Nunavut and Wuhan, China "[even] at the best of times". However, he noted that the territory's housing shortages could impact many residents if community transmission were to occur. [15] MLA John Main showed particular concern towards elders, residents of overcrowded homes, government staff, and residents receiving income support, and suggested that the concept of "social distancing" was relatively unknown to the culture of Nunavut, since "we’re always inviting people and we’re always getting invited to go eat. It is not our culture at all to not visit." [16]

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami warned that the Inuit population could be disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 due to "long standing social and economic inequities." [16]

March 2020

COVID sign at the post office in Cambridge Bay Covid sign post office Cambridge Bay.jpg
COVID sign at the post office in Cambridge Bay

By mid-March, the government of Nunavut had begun to reduce non-essential travel by its employees. The capital of Iqaluit instituted similar measures, while the hamlets of Cambridge Bay, Coral Harbour, and Igloolik issued recommendations against outside visitors. [16]

On March 17, all schools and daycares in Nunavut, as well as Nunavut Arctic College, were closed for at least three weeks. Some educational institutions transitioned to online courses. [17] Nunavut declared a public health emergency the next day; this included orders for anyone entering the territory to immediately self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, and recommendations against non-essential travel to the territory. Restaurants and bars were restricted to takeout service only. [18] [19] [20]

Patterson stated that testing of suspected cases was being conducted by health care professionals at patients' homes. The tests were shipped to a laboratory in Winnipeg for processing. Premier Joe Savikataaq stated that at least half of the 50 to 60 tests conducted at that point had been processed, and had all come back negative. [19] [20]

On March 19, residents of Rankin Inlet set up a blockade on the road leading to Agnico Eagle's Meliadine gold mine, protesting the possibility that workers who fly in via the hamlet's airport could spread COVID-19 among residents. In response, the company announced that the Nunavut-based workforces of its Meliadine and Meadowbank mines would be sent home for four weeks with pay. The company stated: "we value our relationship with the people of Nunavut and are committed to do what is best for the health, safety and well-being of all our employees and the communities." [21] During the day's briefing, Minister of Economic Development and Transportation David Akeeagok stated that the company had already taken steps to alleviate potential spread, including screening employees for symptoms before they were allowed to take a flight, and having them depart immediately by bus on arrival (rather than go through the airport) to prevent community contact. [21]

On March 23, it was announced that travel into Nunavut would be significantly restricted beginning March 25, with only residents of the territory and essential medical workers allowed to enter the region. All travellers would be required to quarantine for 14 days at a hotel in one of four "hub" cities before they would be allowed to fly into Nunavut. [22] Premier Savikataaq stressed that "social distancing and staying home as much as possible is not a recommendation. It is necessary to keep our Nunavut healthy. Do it for you. Do it for our elders. Do it for the children." [22]

April 2020

In early April, 23 inmates were released from local corrections facilities as a precautionary measure in order to prevent crowding. [23] On April 3, the government and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated announced a combined $2 million investment in food security, to be allocated to individual hamlets. [24] On April 14, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that the federal government would provide $30.9 million in financial aid to Nunavut (as part of a $129.9 million package for Canada's territories) to support health care, businesses, and Northern airlines transporting essential goods. [25]

On April 21, following calls by the Nunavut Teachers' Association, [26] it was announced that the remainder of the school year would be cancelled. [27] [28] All out-of-territory teachers were asked to return to Nunavut by April 21. [29]

COVID signs at Cambridge Bay Airport in Inuinnaqtun and English Covid signs at the airport Cambridge Bay.jpg
COVID signs at Cambridge Bay Airport in Inuinnaqtun and English

On April 27, Nunavut issued revisions to its social distancing rules, barring all gatherings of more than five people (regardless of location, excluding immediate family in a household), and clarifying restrictions on commerce, with businesses only allowed to remain open if customers are able to practice appropriate social distancing. [30] On April 29, Patterson announced that the territory would only consider lifting restrictions once there was sufficient testing capacity within Nunavut, there were "significant" decreases in new cases in neighbouring provinces often visited by residents, and there were no active cases in the territory. The state of emergency was also extended to May 14. [31]

On April 30, Nunavut announced its first confirmed case, a resident of Pond Inlet. A rapid response team was dispatched to the community. [32] [33] [34] Following the announcement, most Kivalliq Region hamlets began imposing local curfews and other measures. [35] On May 4, however, Patterson reported that the case was a false positive, and that a second test of the same patient had come back negative. [4] [36] [37]

May 2020

On May 5, when asked about the possibility of staffing shortages when classes resumed, Premier Savikataaq remarked that "September is still quite a few months away, and there was an announcement earlier in the year that Ontario was going to lay off a whole bunch of teachers, so maybe these teachers would want to come work in Nunavut". The Nunavut Teachers' Association criticized the comments, stating that "teachers are in high demand across the country, and the idea that more will simply move in as others move out is false," and that shortages were also the result of a "chronic lack of support in schools for students and educators," and not just the pandemic. [38] Premier Savikataaq apologized for the comments, explaining that his choice of words was "careless and dismissive." Acknowledging the increased stress teachers face in the region, he stated that "we do value our teachers and we have a recruitment and retention problem in Nunavut." [39]

On May 8, Patterson stated that a GeneXPert machine was being used to process swabs in Iqaluit, but the swabs were still being sent south for secondary tests. As of May 11, 553 residents had tested negative. [40]

On May 14, the state of emergency was extended through May 28. Premier Savikataaq stated that the health department was preparing plans to begin lifting some restrictions. [41] [42]

On May 18, Patterson stated that a resident of Nunavut had tested positive for COVID-19 while outside of the territory for unrelated medical treatments. He stated that the patient "is receiving care in the South and is doing well" and posed minimal risk due to mandatory self-isolation before returning to Nunavut, and that no other information would be released for patient confidentiality reasons. There had still been no cases inside of Nunavut. [43]

On May 28, the state of emergency was extended through June 11. [44]

June 2020, lifting of restrictions

On May 25, Patterson released "Nunavut's Path," a framework for the gradual lifting of restrictions. Measures to be lifted were classified by their risk, and the impact of the reopening process was to be reevaluated every two weeks by the territorial health department, which would determine whether further restrictions (including those designated as medium- and high-risk) could be lifted, or if they needed to be reintroduced. [45] Existing restrictions on travel into the territory would remain in place indefinitely, likely until a vaccine or proven therapy was discovered. [46] [47]

On June 1, parks and daycares were allowed to reopen, and outdoor gatherings of up to 25 people were permitted. That day, Patterson also announced that an advisory against domestic travel within the territory had been lifted, and that on June 8, government employees would be allowed to return to their offices (subject to social distancing and health protocols, after having been re-classified as a low-risk opening), and that libraries, museums, and galleries would be allowed to reopen to individual browsing only. [46] [47]

On June 11, the state of emergency was extended through June 25, and it was announced that recreation centres would be allowed to re-open on June 15 (although Iqaluit held off on immediately reopening its aquatic centre, due to needs to adapt the facility for compliance with social distancing guidelines, and to perform repairs on equipment that had failed during the closure). [48] [49]

On June 22, bars, restaurants, and personal care facilities were allowed to re-open, subject to social distancing, and with a last call of 9 p.m. for bars. Personal care facilities were required to offer protective equipment to customers and employees who requested them. Cabs could pick up people from multiple households at once, provided they wore masks. [50] [51]

July 2020

COVID sign promoting social distancing at one of the local stores in Cambridge Bay Covid sign store Cambridge Bay 2.jpg
COVID sign promoting social distancing at one of the local stores in Cambridge Bay

On July 2, Nunavut announced it was monitoring a presumptive case from an employee of the Mary River Mine. The Department of Health stated that the employee was "doing well" and had "no contact between Mary River workers and any of the surrounding communities," and that the employee and all contacts were in quarantine. The mine had been operated solely by outside workers since March. [52] On July 10, it was reported that the patient had tested negative on follow-up tests. [5] On July 13, it was announced that restaurants would be allowed to resume operating at normal business hours beginning July 20. [53] [54]

On July 20, the federal government announced that up to $18.9 million in funding would be provided to cover PPE, testing, and paid sick leave. [55]

September to October 2020

Schools resumed in-person classes for the new semester, with cohorting, mandatory masks in certain situations for students over the age of 13, and social distancing. A four-level system would be used to escalate mitigations if Nunavut experienced a heightened rate of infections (including staggered or alternate-day schedules, or suspension of in-person classes). [56]

On September 16, two positive cases were reported in the Hope Bay mine near Cambridge Bay. [57] One positive case was also confirmed at the Mary River Mine on September 21. [8] These cases were not counted towards Nunavut's case count, since the transmissions were believed to have occurred before the infected people entered the territory. [8] On September 28, the presumptive positive cases at Hope Bay mine increased to seven. [58]

On October 1, one employee from the Meliadine mine tested positive for the virus. [8] On October 5, Nunavut confirmed seven of the Hope Bay cases, although whether they would count as the territory's first official cases was still being determined. [59] The same day, it was announced that restaurants and bars could increase to 75% capacity with social distancing, bars could return to normal hours; outdoor gatherings could increase to 100 and indoor to 15; arenas and recreation facilities were capped at 50 people; and galleries, libraries, and museums could operate at half capacity. [59]

Nunavut declared the Hope Bay outbreak contained on October 8, with 10 confirmed cases and six still presumptive; the territory did not count the cases as part of its local total, as they fell under the case counts of the individual employees' provinces or territories of origin. [6] [7]

On October 21, another presumptive case at the Mary River Mine was confirmed to be positive. [60]

November 2020–present

On November 6, Nunavut confirmed its first case, in Sanikiluaq. All non-essential businesses and schools were ordered to close, grocery stores were ordered to limit capacity and reduce hours, indoor gatherings were prohibited, outdoor gatherings were limited to five, and non-essential travel into and out of the area was restricted. [10] [61] Two days later, a second confirmed case was reported in Sanikiluaq. [62] [63] On November 9, Patterson stated that a person had tested positive at an isolation hub in Winnipeg. It was thought that the person contracted COVID-19 before entering the isolation hub. [64]

On November 11, a third case was confirmed by Patterson in Rankin Inlet. As a result, restrictions were implemented in the Kivalliq region, and local schools and colleges announced they would close for at least 14 days. [65] On November 13, a case was reported in Arviat, [66] and on November 14 another four cases were found in Arviat, doubling the total to eight. [67] On November 15, nine new cases were reported in Arviat, and a second in Rankin Inlet [68]

On November 16, after announcing eight new cases (bringing the territory's total to 26), Patterson announced that a two-week restriction period would be implemented territory-wide from November 18 in order to control community transmission in Nunavut. [69] All gatherings were limited to five people unless otherwise noted, while non-essential businesses, bars, dine-in restaurants, personal care facilities, and schools were ordered closed. All businesses and organizations were required to switch to remote work if possible. Medical centres would serve emergency patients only. Masks remained strongly recommended territory wide, but as before, were mandated only in Kivalliq and Sanikiluaq. [69]

Premier Savikataaq referred to the restrictions as being like "[a] circuit breaker, a chance to reset. No one is above the rules here. Let's make this clear, so there's no misunderstanding. Do not visit, do not socialize outside your household." [69] In an interview with CTV News Channel's Power Play , Premier Savikataaq stated that all of the cases so far had a connection to Winnipeg, that community transmission in Nunavut was of concern due to overcrowding within its communities, but that "our saving grace is we've had time to prepare." [70]

On November 17, a further 34 new cases were announced, more than doubling the total number of active cases, from 26 to 60. There were 26 new cases reported in Arviat, and eight in Whale Cove. The government stated that seven of the people in Whale Cove were infected by a person travelling from Arviat. [71] On November 18, another 10 cases were reported (totalling 70), with eight in Arviat and two new cases in Rankin Inlet. [72] [73]

On November 19, four new cases were announced in Nunavut: three in Arviat and one in Rankin Inlet. [74] These were followed by another ten new cases on November 20: six in Rankin Inlet, one in Arviat and three in Whale Cove. This brought the total cases to 84. [75]

On December 20, the territory's first two deaths linked to COVID-19 were reported; one resident of Arviat and one resident of Rankin Inlet died in a Winnipeg hospital. [76]

The first vaccine, of Moderna type, arrived in Iqaluit on December 30 and was administered on January 6, 2021. [77]

In May 2021, the Mary River Mine announced an outbreak, and shut down operations, sending many employees home. 106 employees tested positive, 96 of whom were positive with the Delta variant, a highly transmissible variant of the virus. The workers who returned home are believed to have spread the virus from the mine, including the Delta variant, and have been linked to several hundred cases in Ontario, Alberta, and elsewhere. However, since the mine employees have not been in contact with local communities since the start of the pandemic, there has been no spread in Nunavut linked to the mine. The mine has had no positive cases since June 5. [12] [13] [14]

Response

Travel restrictions

On March 13, Patterson issued an advisory requesting residents reduce domestic travel and avoid international travel. [16] Transport Canada announced the same day that cruise ship traffic to Nunavut would be suspended for the remainder of the season. [16]

Starting March 25, air entry into Nunavut by non-residents was prohibited, with exemptions granted for critical medical workers. Residents returning to the territory are required to quarantine for 14 days at a hotel in either Edmonton, Ottawa, Winnipeg, or Yellowknife before flying back. They are monitored by security guards enforcing the quarantine, and are provided with meals. [22] These services are paid for by the government; on May 6, Premier Savikataaq backpedalled on a proposal to require these hotel stays be covered by the traveller (at a cost of $2,100 per person), as "travel at this time is a risk and we don't want to undo all the hard work we have done." [78] Exceptions were later made for those receiving medical treatment in Yellowknife. [79] The travel advisory against in-territory travel ended June 1, but other restrictions remained. [47]

On June 4, Patterson said he was in discussions with officials from the Northwest Territories over the possibility of removing restrictions on travel between Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. He noted that such an arrangement would have to be designed so that it would not be usable as a loophole to bypass Nunavut's quarantine requirements. [80]

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association issued a letter to Minister of Justice Jeannie Ehaloak questioning whether the territory's travel restrictions were in compliance with Section 6 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. On June 11, after the Northwest Territories partly loosened its travel restrictions (which previously contained a similar quarantine hub requirement and restriction to residents, in favour of allowing unrestricted travel — subject to self-isolation on arrival) as a result of similar concerns, Patterson stated that based on the opinion of lawyers, the decision to suspend freedom of movement was allowable under the Charter due to the emergency declaration. He argued that the measure was needed due to the stronger impact that an outbreak could have in Nunavut than in other parts of the country. In regards to the decision's impact on the proposed "travel bubble," Patterson stated that they were "still interested in it but we want to understand how this will impact potential risks before we make a firm decision one way or another." [48] [49]

On June 15, it was announced that travellers from the Northwest Territories would be allowed to enter Nunavut, provided they had been in the region for at least 14 days before entering and had received approval from Nunavut health officials. [51] On June 22, medical travel to Churchill, Manitoba was exempted from Nunavut's quarantine requirements, citing a low risk because there had been no cases in the town. [50] On July 13, it was announced that restrictions on travel to Churchill would be lifted, but subject to approval by health officials. [53] On November 16, the Northwest Territories suspended its open borders with Nunavut due to the latter territory's first ongoing outbreak. [81]

By hamlets

On April 30, Chesterfield Inlet passed a motion prohibiting any outside visitors from entering the hamlet. It also required returning residents to self-isolate for 14 days. [35]

In May 2020, to reinforce social distancing laws by discouraging gatherings, a number of hamlets began to institute temporary restrictions on any consumption, possession, or distribution of alcohol. [82]

Impact

The pandemic is projected to have a major impact on the territory's $300 million tourism industry. [83] The cruise line industry could potentially be severely affected. Previous years saw 55 ships with over 10,000 visitors. [16] [84]

Related Research Articles

Rankin Inlet Place in Nunavut, Canada

Rankin Inlet is an Inuit hamlet on Kudlulik Peninsula in Nunavut, Canada. It is the largest hamlet and second-largest settlement in Nunavut, after the territorial capital, Iqaluit. On the northwestern Hudson Bay, between Chesterfield Inlet and Arviat, it is the regional centre for the Kivalliq Region.

Arviat Hamlet in Nunavut, Canada

Arviat is a predominantly Inuit hamlet located on the western shore of Hudson Bay in the Kivalliq Region of Nunavut, Canada. Arviat is derived from the Inuktitut word arviq meaning "Bowhead whale". Earlier in history, its name was Tikirajualaaq, and Ittaliurvik,.

Tagak Curley is an Inuit leader, politician and businessman from Nunavut. As a prominent figure in the negotiations that led to the creation of Nunavut, Tagak is considered a living father of confederation in Canada. He was born in a hunting camp at Coral Harbour, Northwest Territories.

Nunavut Territory of Canada

Nunavut is the largest and northernmost territory of Canada. It was separated officially from the Northwest Territories on April 1, 1999, via the Nunavut Act and the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act, which provided this territory to the Inuit for independent government. The boundaries had been drawn in 1993. The creation of Nunavut resulted in the first major change to Canada's political map since the province of Newfoundland was admitted in 1949.

Kevin J. O'Brien is a Canadian politician. Born in Cape Breton Island Nova Scotia, O'Brien is a union negotiator, former civil servant and a former municipal and territorial level politician who has served as a Member of both the Northwest Territories Legislature and the Nunavut Legislature. He served as Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut from 2000 to 2004.

Lorne Kusugak is a Canadian politician, who is Member of the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut for the electoral district of Rankin Inlet South. Prior to becoming an MLA, Kusugak was the mayor of Rankin Inlet. Kusugak served as the Nunavut Minister for Community and Government Services, Minister for Energy and the Minister responsible for the Qulliq Energy Corporation.

Mary River Mine Iron ore mine on Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

The Mary River Mine is an open pit iron ore mine on Inuit Owned Land (IOL) operated by the Baffinland Iron Mines Corporation (BIMC), in the Mary River area of the Qikiqtaaluk Region, on Baffin Island, Nunavut, in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. As of 2021, Mary River mine operation consists of an open-pit mine, two work camps for hundreds of workers, a tote road—from the Mary River site to Milne Inlet—and a port infrastructure at Milne Inlet. According to a 4-year study published in 2008, the Mary River Mine, with its four massive iron ore deposits of 65-70% pure iron ore was "one of the most promising undeveloped iron deposits on the planet". It was not until technological advances were in place in 2010, and the market for iron ore had dramatically increased that sizable financial backing for the high cost of development in a remote region known for its inhospitable climate, was available. The mine began operations in 2014, and the first shipment to Europe arrived in 2015. Baffinland is currently planning on expanding the mine. In February 2021, a group of Inuit hunters blockaded access to the mine for a week to protest the expansion.

Joe Savikataaq Canadian politician

Joe Savikataaq is a Canadian politician who is currently serving as the fifth and current premier of Nunavut. He was elected premier on June 14, 2018 by the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut, after his predecessor Paul Quassa lost a no-confidence vote.

2017 Nunavut general election

The 2017 Nunavut general election was held on October 30, 2017 to return the members of the 5th Nunavut Legislature. The fifth general election held since the creation of the territory in 1999, it was the first election held under Nunavut's new fixed election dates law, which requires elections to be held no more than four years after the prior election.

COVID-19 pandemic in Canada Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Canada

The COVID-19 pandemic in Canada is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019. It is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Most cases over the course of the pandemic have been in Ontario, Quebec and Alberta, with Alberta significantly ahead of those two largest provinces for cases per capita. Confirmed cases have been reported in all of Canada's provinces and territories.

The COVID-19 pandemic in British Columbia forms part of an ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). On January 28, 2020, British Columbia became the second province to confirm a case of COVID-19 in Canada. The first case of infection involved a patient who had recently returned from Wuhan, Hubei, China. The first case of community transmission in Canada was confirmed in British Columbia on March 5, 2020.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Newfoundland and Labrador is an ongoing viral pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). As of November 12, 2021, there have been 2,025 cases and sixteen deaths confirmed in Newfoundland and Labrador. 334,272* tests have been completed as of October 29, 2021.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Manitoba is a viral pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

The COVID-19 pandemic in Alberta is part of an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The province of Alberta has the third-most cases of COVID-19 in Canada, behind only Ontario and Quebec.

The COVID-19 pandemic in New Brunswick is an ongoing viral pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The province of New Brunswick has the eighth-most cases of COVID-19 in Canada. As of October 10, 2021, New Brunswick has reported 5,160 cases, with the first one reported on March 11, 2020. There have been 4,123 recoveries and 74 deaths. 489,917 tests have been completed as of October 10, 2021.

COVID-19 pandemic in the Northwest Territories Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Northwest Territories, Canada

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Northwest Territories is part of an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). As of July 5, 2021, there have been 128 confirmed cases in the Canadian territory of the Northwest Territories with 28 cases recovered. 11,789 tests have been conducted, with 11,758 negative results.

The following is a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada:

This is a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in Saskatchewan.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Northern Territory is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during 2020.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "COVID-19 (Novel Coronavirus) Nunavut COVID-19 Case Update". Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved June 26, 2021.
  2. "The benefits of isolation: Nunavut doesn't have a single confirmed case of COVID-19". National Post. April 10, 2020. Archived from the original on September 24, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  3. "Nunavut's first case of COVID-19 confirmed in Sanikiluaq". CTV News. November 6, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 7, 2020.
  4. 1 2 "Top doctor apologizes for Nunavut's only COVID-19 case turning out to be false positive". CBC News. May 4, 2020. Archived from the original on May 5, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  5. 1 2 Neary, Derek (July 10, 2020). "Presumed case of Covid at Mary River mine turns out negative". Nunavut News. Archived from the original on July 20, 2020. Retrieved July 20, 2020.
  6. 1 2 Punter, Cody (October 8, 2020). "Hope Bay Mine Covid-19 outbreak considered contained by GN". Nunavut News. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved October 9, 2020.
  7. 1 2 "Nunavut says coronavirus outbreak at Hope Bay gold mine contained". Canadian Press. October 8, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved October 9, 2020.
  8. 1 2 3 4 "Nunavut mine employee tests positive for COVID-19". CBC News. October 1, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  9. Murphy, Jessica (October 19, 2020). "Coronavirus: The place in North America with no cases". BBC. Archived from the original on October 19, 2020. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  10. 1 2 "COVID-19 GN Update - November 6, 2020". Government of Nunavut. November 6, 2020. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  11. "COVID-19 GN Update - November 16, 2020". Government of Nunavut. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  12. 1 2 Yang, Jennifer (June 12, 2021). "How a massive outbreak at Nunavut's Baffinland mine sent 'sparks' of the Delta variant across the country". The Toronto Star. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  13. 1 2 Venn, David (June 18, 2021). "Red Cross to help Baffinland contact-trace COVID-19 outbreak". Nunatsiaq News. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  14. 1 2 Flanagan, Ryan (June 15, 2021). "Red Cross called in to help amid Delta variant outbreak at Nunavut mine". CTV News. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  15. 1 2 "Nunavut monitoring coronavirus outbreak, says chief health officer". Nunatsiaq News. January 28, 2020. Archived from the original on April 7, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  16. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Nunavut braces for COVID-19". APTN National News. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on April 1, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  17. Murray, Nick (March 16, 2020). "All Nunavut schools and daycares to close for three weeks". CBC. Archived from the original on March 21, 2020.
  18. Neary, Derek (March 18, 2020). "Nunavut declares public health emergency; bars to close; restaurants takeout only; limitations on taxis". Nunavut News. Archived from the original on May 29, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  19. 1 2 "Nunavut declares state of public health emergency". CBC News. March 18, 2020. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  20. 1 2 Deuling, Meagan (March 19, 2020). "Nunavut declares public health emergency ahead of any coronavirus cases". CTV News. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  21. 1 2 "Agnico Eagle sends home Nunavut workers as Rankin Inlet residents blockade road". CBC News. March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on May 1, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  22. 1 2 3 "Nunavut enacts strictest travel regulations in Canada". APTN National News. March 23, 2020. Archived from the original on April 7, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  23. Neary, Derek (April 9, 2020). "Twenty-three Nunavut inmates released due to Covid-19 concerns". NNSL Media. Archived from the original on April 23, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  24. Neary, Derek (April 3, 2020). "GN and NTI fund $2 million worth of food for Nunavut communities". NNSL Media. Archived from the original on April 23, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  25. "Federal government providing nearly $130M to help territories, northern businesses during pandemic". CBC News. April 14, 2020. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  26. Greer, Darrell (April 15, 2020). "Many anxiously await Nunavut schools decision to be announced by April 21". Nunavut News. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  27. "Close Nunavut schools for the year, says teachers' association president". Nunatsiaq News. April 9, 2020. Archived from the original on April 15, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  28. "Nunavut schools closed to students for the rest of the year". Nunatsiaq News . April 20, 2020. Archived from the original on April 28, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  29. "Nunavut asks out-of-territory teachers to return by April 21". Nunatsiaq News. April 7, 2020. Archived from the original on April 15, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  30. Sara, Frizzell (April 27, 2020). "Gatherings of more than 5 people prohibited in Nunavut, as gov't clarifies COVID-19 rules". CBC News. Archived from the original on April 28, 2020. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  31. "Nunavut must meet three conditions before lifting COVID-19 restrictions". Nunatsiaq News. April 29, 2020. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  32. Dawson, Tyler (April 30, 2020). "Nunavut confirms first case of COVID-19: 'It was only a matter of time'". National Post. Toronto ON, Edmonton AB. Archived from the original on September 24, 2020. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  33. Tranter, Emma (April 30, 2020). "Nunavut begins contact tracing in connection with first COVID-19 case". Nunatsiaq News. Iqaluit, Nunavut: Nortext Publishing Corporation. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  34. Frizzell, Sara (April 30, 2020). "Nunavut reports 1st case of COVID-19 in Pond Inlet". CBC.ca. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  35. 1 2 "Nunavut's Kivalliq communities adopt more COVID-19 preventive measures". Nunatsiaq News. May 4, 2020. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  36. "'Huge relief': Nunavut's first coronavirus case a false positive". Global News. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  37. "Nunavut returns to having no cases of COVID-19". Nunatsiaq News. May 4, 2020. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  38. "Nunavut teachers' union criticizes premier's recruitment plans". Nunatsiaq News. May 5, 2020. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 8, 2020.
  39. "Nunavut teachers' union accepts premier's apology". Nunatsiaq News. May 7, 2020. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020. Retrieved May 8, 2020.
  40. "Nunavut government says COVID-19 restrictions will stay in place". CBC News. May 11, 2020. Archived from the original on May 12, 2020. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  41. Brown, Beth (May 14, 2020). "Nunavut's reopening plan could come next week, say officials". CBC News. Archived from the original on May 15, 2020. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  42. "Nunavut's re-opening plan likely coming next week". Nunatsiaq News. May 14, 2020. Archived from the original on May 16, 2020. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  43. "Nunavut resident on medical travel tests positive for COVID-19". Nunatsiaq News. May 18, 2020. Archived from the original on May 20, 2020. Retrieved May 19, 2020.
  44. "Nunavut extends public health emergency until June 11". CBC News. May 28, 2020. Archived from the original on May 30, 2020. Retrieved June 10, 2020.
  45. "Nunavut government releases COVID-19 reopening plan". CBC News. May 25, 2020. Archived from the original on May 27, 2020. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  46. 1 2 Sharma, Rajnesh (June 1, 2020). "Nunavut lifts some Covid-19 restrictions, allows in-territory travel". Nunavut News. Archived from the original on June 19, 2020. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  47. 1 2 3 "In-territory travel restrictions lifted, Nunavut public servants return to work June 8". CBC News. June 1, 2020. Archived from the original on June 1, 2020. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  48. 1 2 "Nunavut public health emergency extended to June 25". CBC News. June 11, 2020. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  49. 1 2 "Nunavut prepares to allow gyms and pools to reopen". Nunatsiaq News. June 11, 2020. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  50. 1 2 "Medical travel to Churchill allowed from Nunavut, no isolation required". CBC News. June 22, 2020. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  51. 1 2 "Travel into Nunavut allowed from Northwest Territories". CBC News. June 15, 2020. Archived from the original on June 28, 2020. Retrieved July 20, 2020.
  52. "Nunavut announces presumptive case of COVID-19 at Mary River mine". Nunatsiaq News. July 3, 2020. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  53. 1 2 "Nunavut bars and restaurants can open with full hours next week, says top doctor". CBC News. July 13, 2020. Archived from the original on July 20, 2020. Retrieved July 20, 2020.
  54. "COVID-19 restrictions mean big changes for Nunavut's largest restaurant". Nunatsiaq News. September 2, 2020. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  55. Brown, Beth (July 20, 2020). "Nunavut to get $18.9M from feds for COVID-19 response". CBC News. Archived from the original on July 20, 2020. Retrieved July 20, 2020.
  56. Neary, Derek (August 31, 2020). "School year begins with apprehension, reassurance". Nunavut News. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved September 3, 2020.
  57. "2 positive cases of COVID-19 confirmed at Nunavut's Hope Bay mine". CBC News. September 19, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved October 5, 2020.
  58. "7 presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 reported at Nunavut's Hope Bay Mine". CBC News. September 28, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved October 5, 2020.
  59. 1 2 "Nunavut confirms outbreak of COVID-19 at Hope Bay mine". CBC News. October 6, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved October 6, 2020.
  60. "Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Thursday". CBC News. October 22, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved October 22, 2020.
  61. "Nunavut confirms 1st case of COVID-19". CBC News. November 6, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 7, 2020.
  62. "Nunavut declares territory's second COVID-19 case in Sanikiluaq". Nunatsiaq News. November 9, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 10, 2020.
  63. "GN confirms second positive COVID-19 case in Sanikiluaq". Government of Nunavut. November 8, 2020. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  64. "Nunavut health officials confirm case of COVID-19 at Winnipeg isolation hub". CBC News. November 9, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  65. "Nunavut confirms case of COVID-19 in Rankin Inlet". CBC News. November 11, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  66. "Nunavut's fourth COVID-19 case confirmed in Arviat". Nunatsiaq News. November 13, 2020. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  67. "Four new COVID-19 cases reported in Arviat, doubling Nunavut's caseload". Nunatsiaq News. November 16, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  68. "Nunavut COVID-19 tally climbs to 18 as nine new cases reported in Arviat". Nunatsiaq News. November 16, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  69. 1 2 3 "Nunavut officials to give update on COVID-19 outbreak, moves territory to 2-week restriction period". CBC News. November 16, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  70. "Nunavut premier warns overcrowding could worsen COVID-19 outbreak". CTV News. November 16, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  71. "Nunavut's COVID-19 caseload more than doubles overnight to 60". CBC News. November 16, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  72. "Nunavut reaches new high of 70 COVID-19 cases on Wednesday, officials say". CBC News. November 18, 2020. Archived from the original on November 18, 2020. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  73. "Nunavut reaches 70 cases as recent outbreak continues to surge". CBC News. November 18, 2020. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  74. "Nunavut reports 4 new cases of COVID-19". CBC News. November 19, 2020. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  75. "Sanikiluaq 'almost certainly' contained, says chief medical officer as Nunavut reports 10 new COVID-19 cases". CBC News. November 19, 2020. Archived from the original on November 25, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  76. George, Jane (December 20, 2020). "Nunavut reports first and second COVID-19 deaths". Nunatsiaq News. Archived from the original on December 20, 2020. Retrieved December 21, 2020.
  77. Patar, Dustin (January 6, 2021). "Nunavut begins COVID-19 vaccinations". Nunatsiaq News.
  78. "Nunavut government reverses plan to have residents pay for own hotel quarantine". CBC News. May 6, 2020. Archived from the original on May 7, 2020. Retrieved May 6, 2020.
  79. Sharma, Rajnesh (June 11, 2020). "Nunavut and Northwest Territories continue to discuss a travel bubble". Nunavut News. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  80. "Nunavut and N.W.T. plan to ease inter-territorial travel restrictions". Nunatsiaq News. June 5, 2020. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  81. "Travel 'bubble' between N.W.T. and Nunavut suspended until further notice". CBC News. November 16, 2020. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  82. "To boost COVID-19 prevention efforts, more Nunavut hamlets adopt booze bans". Nunatsiaq News. May 11, 2020. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  83. "COVID-19 batters Nunavut's travel industry; 75% of tourism businesses may close in second quarter". NNSL Media. April 3, 2020. Archived from the original on April 23, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  84. "Nunavut daycares say they're at risk of going bankrupt during pandemic". Nunatsiaq News. April 28, 2020. Archived from the original on April 28, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.