COVID-19 pandemic in Queensland

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in Queensland
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
First outbreak Wuhan, Hubei, China
Confirmed cases1,955
Active cases165
Hospitalised cases41
Critical cases1
Recovered1,762
Deaths
7
Fatality rate0.38%
Government website
www.covid19.qld.gov.au

The COVID-19 pandemic in Queensland is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 ( COVID-19 ) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Contents

Timeline

Queensland Police checkpoint at Coolangatta on 4 April 2020 Queensland Border Closure - Griffith Street Checkpoint 1.jpg
Queensland Police checkpoint at Coolangatta on 4 April 2020
Boundary Street Coolangatta, with barricades blocking access from New South Wales Qld Border Closure - Coolangatta Boundary St.jpg
Boundary Street Coolangatta, with barricades blocking access from New South Wales
COVID-19 preventive measures stickers on a pedestrian signal pole in Queensland Queensland Government COVID-19 preventative measures stickers on a pedestrian signal pole.jpg
COVID-19 preventive measures stickers on a pedestrian signal pole in Queensland

2020

On 29 January 2020, Queensland was the first to declare a public health emergency. [1] The legislation was strengthened on 6 February by the Public Health (Declared Public Health Emergencies) Amendment Bill 2020. [2] In March, power was given directly to the Chief Health Officer (rather than the Health Minister on behalf of the Cabinet) to make 'Directions', amongst other things allowing her to declare restrictions on movement, gatherings and business activities, to set social distancing or masking requirements, and to close borders. [3] As of the end of July 2021, Queensland had recorded the death of just 7 patients with Covid-19. [4] This fatality rate, of just under 1 per million residents, was the lowest not just in Australia, but of any sizeable jurisdiction with its own policing and health powers, in the world.

Key directions made under the Public Health Act 2005 include:

Restricted entry into Queensland was introduced, with only Queensland residents and those considered an 'exempt person' being allowed to enter Queensland by air, sea, rail or road from another state or territory. [7] This was introduced in stages: Stage 1 started on 26 March 2020, with stages 2 and 3 involving tightening the restrictions. Stage 4, introduced on 11 April, was the most restrictive, every person crossing the border including Queensland residents required a permit. In addition, a person who had been in a declared COVID-19 hotspot in the previous 14 days had to self-quarantine for 14 days. [8]

Closures of areas within Queensland included:

Access to the Torres Strait Islands has been restricted to prevent COVID-19 from reaching the region, which has to date remained free of cases. [12]

2021

On 1 February 2021, Queensland opened its border to all Australian states and territories except Western Australia. Since the border closures were implemented, 6,855,750 border passes were issued. [13]

On 22 February, the first Queenslander received a COVID-19 vaccination at Gold Coast University Hospital. She was a nurse who works in that hospital's COVID-19 ward. [14]

On 28 February 2021, the "Check in Qld" QR code sign-in/contact tracing app was launched by the Minister for Health and Ambulance Services, Yvette D'Ath. It is based on the ACT "Check in CBR" app. Use of the app is not mandatory. [15]

On 12 March, Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane went into lockdown after a doctor tested positive for COVID-19. This was the beginning of one cluster in Brisbane connected to that hospital. Queensland had gone 59 days without any locally acquired COVID-19 infections. [16]

Due to a growing cluster in Bondi, Sydney, from 1am on 24 June, the Queensland government declared all of Greater Sydney was a hotspot. Border entry will be refused to anyone who lives in, or has visited: Greater Sydney, the Blue Mountains, Central Coast, Wollongong or Shellharbour. Residents returning will be quarantined for 14 days. Everyone entering Queensland will have to complete a border declaration. [17]

Brisbane lockdowns

On 8 January 2021, a three-day lockdown was announced by Annastacia Palaszczuk to prevent spread of the more contagious UK strain of coronavirus that escaped from a Brisbane hotel quarantine. The lockdown applied to all of greater Brisbane including council areas of Brisbane, Ipswich, Logan City, Moreton Bay and Redland City from 6 pm that day. [18] More than 2 million residents were affected. [19]

On 29 March at 5 pm, Greater Brisbane went into yet another three-day lockdown. The step was taken when a second cluster of the UK strain of COVID-19 grew to seven people. Two of them were an un-vaccinated nurse from Princess Alexandra Hospital, and her sister. [20] By 30 March another 8 locally acquired cases were reported, for a total of 10 new cases in the preceding 24 hours, and 2 separate clusters, both UK strain were identified. As of this date Queensland had 78 active cases in hospitals. [21] On 31 March in Queensland 34,711 coronavirus tests and 7,596 vaccinations were conducted. [22]

On 1 April, the "three-day" lockdown was lifted five hours early at midday. Though 10 new cases had been recorded in the previous 24 hours, there was only one case of community transmission, which was linked to the second cluster surrounding the infected nurse from the Princess Alexandra Hospital. This cluster now numbered 12, up from 7 on 29 March. [22]

Some restrictions introduced for the lockdown were maintained temporarily: [22]

  • all Queenslanders had to carry a face-mask outside their home until 15 April,
  • patrons at food or beverage venues had to stay seated, no dancing allowed,
  • 30 person limit at private gatherings at homes statewide,
  • businesses and churches could open, but have only one-person-per 2-square-metres of floor area,
  • visitors were not permitted for 2 weeks at: aged or disabled care facilities, hospitals and prisons. [22]

On 28 June Queensland recorded 3 new COVID-19 cases overnight. 2 were locally acquired, one acquired overseas. A miner was found to be infected with the Delta variant of COVID-19 after returning from the Northern Territory. As a result of these cases, from 10pm on 29 June, masks became mandatory in these local government areas: [23]

In addition:

  • Masks must be worn in workplaces when another person is present.
  • Dancing is again banned
  • No more than 30 people are allowed inside homes. [23]

After the lockdown was expanded: [25]

  • Masks mandatory when leaving the house.
  • Household visitors limited to 2
  • Funerals restricted to 20 people
  • Weddings restricted to 10 people
    • dancing and singing not allowed

Restaurants and cafes can only provide: [25]

  • take away
  • home delivery.
Lockdown expansion

On 29 June from 6pm the lockdown was expanded to new areas. All of: [24]

went into lockdown for 3 days, till 6pm on 2 July. This move was taken after a casual clerical worker from Prince Charles Hospital in Brisbane, who worked outside the COVID ward as a concierge, became infected with the Delta variant and travelled from Sandgate in Brisbane to Magnetic Island and Townsville where she visited markets. [24] [25]

On 23 July, the border with NSW was closed from 1:00am due to locations outside Greater Sydney reporting COVID-19 cases. From 6:00am on 23 July to 6:00am on 20 August the same rules will be used across the state, except for SE Queensland where masks were still required. [26]

In SE Queensland wearing a face mask is mandatory whenever outside the home, unless: [26]

  • in a car alone
    • or with household members
  • eating or drinking
  • exercising
  • outdoors alone
    • or with household members
  • it is unsafe [26]

On 24 July 2021, there was an anti-lockdown protest in Brisbane. There were also protests in Melbourne, and in Sydney, where several people were arrested, infringement notices issued and over 50 people charged. [27] [28]

On 31 July from 4pm, 11 LGAs in South East Queensland went into a snap lockdown for 3 days. This was after 6 new locally acquired cases of the Delta COVID variant. The areas affected were:
Brisbane, Gold Coast, Ipswich, Lockyer Valley, Logan, Moreton Bay, Noosa, Redlands, Sunshine Coast, Somerset and Scenic Rim. One of the cases is a medical student at the University of Queensland, who had been to many venues, including Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, the University of Queensland, and the Translational Research Institute at Princess Alexandra Hospital. [29]

By 1 August there were 18 locally acquired cases of Delta variant. Deputy Premier Steven Miles said that the 9 new cases were the greatest number since August 2020. [30]

On 2 August there were 15 new cases of COVID-19, 2 overseas acquired. Consequently, the South-east Queensland’s lockdown was extended until 4:00pm on 8 August (Sunday). [31] The same day, because of the extension, the Ekka agricultural show was cancelled for the second year, 5 days before it was to be open to the public from 7 August (Saturday). [32] [33]

On 8 August the lockdown in SE Queensland ended, though some restrictions remained in force, including mandatory wearing of masks. [34]

On 9 August, Cairns went into lockdown from 4:00pm for three days. This was due to an "unexpected" case of COVID-19, a taxi driver who was infectious in the community for ten days. [35]

Event cancellations

Statistics

COVID-19 cumulative cases in Queensland [44]

COVID-19 daily cases in Queensland [44]

See also

Related Research Articles

The 2020 NRL season was the 113th season of professional rugby league in Australia and the 23rd season run by the National Rugby League.

COVID-19 pandemic in Australia Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Australia

The COVID-19 pandemic in Australia is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first confirmed case in Australia was identified on 25 January 2020, in Victoria, when a man who had returned from Wuhan, Hubei, China, tested positive for the virus.

COVID-19 pandemic in Oceania Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Oceania

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached Oceania on 25 January 2020 with the first confirmed case reported in Melbourne, Australia. It has since spread elsewhere in the region, although many small Pacific island nations have thus far avoided the outbreak by closing their international borders. Three Oceania sovereign states and one dependency have yet to report a case. Australia and New Zealand were praised for their handling of the pandemic in comparison to other Western nations, with New Zealand and each state in Australia wiping out all community transmission of the virus several times even after re-introduction the community. However, by August 2021, some Australian states had conceded defeat in their eradication efforts.

National responses to the COVID-19 pandemic Internal responses of the nations of the world

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, national responses have been varied, and have included containment measures such as lockdowns, quarantines, and curfews. As of 9 September 2021, more than 222 million cases of COVID-19 have been reported, resulting in more than 4.59 million deaths. The most affected countries in terms of confirmed cases are the United States, Brazil, India, Russia, South Africa, Peru, Mexico, Chile, the United Kingdom, and Iran.

COVID-19 pandemic in Fiji Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Fiji

The COVID-19 pandemic in Fiji is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first case of the disease in Fiji was reported on 19 March 2020 in Lautoka. As of 8 September 2021, the country has had a total of 48,393 cases as of which 13,597 are currently active and 528 deaths, with cases reported on the main islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, and outer islands of Malolo, Naviti, Ovalau, Gau and Kadavu. Apart from the COVID-19 deaths, 353 COVID-19 positive patients have died from pre-existing non-COVID-19 related illnesses. In March 2021, Fiji became the first Pacific island country to receive COVID-19 vaccines through the COVAX initiative with frontline workers and first responders the first to be vaccinated. As of 7 September 2021, out of the target population of 587,651, more than 560,000 (97%) Fijians have received their first jab of the vaccine and almost 300,000 (53%) Fijians have received their second jab and are fully vaccinated. To date, only the AstraZeneca vaccine and Moderna vaccine have been deployed in the country. Vaccination is mandatory.

COVID-19 lockdowns Restrictions imposed during COVID-19 pandemic

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of non-pharmaceutical interventions colloquially known as lockdowns have been implemented in numerous countries and territories around the world. These restrictions were established to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. By April 2020, about half of the world's population was under some form of lockdown, with more than 3.9 billion people in more than 90 countries or territories having been asked or ordered to stay at home by their governments. Although similar disease control measures have been used for hundreds of years, the scale seen in the 2020s is thought to be unprecedented.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2020

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

COVID-19 clusters are cases that are known to be related by close contacts. A single cluster may have cases in multiple locations. Some smaller clusters are known to be linked to larger clusters. A cluster may be investigated for days before being announced for the first time. The Victorian Government did not report breakdowns of individual clusters on 10 July 2020 due to widespread community transmission becoming entrenched in the Melbourne metropolitan area. On 8 September 2020, the Victoria Government published numbers relating to all aged care clusters.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in May 2021 Sequence of major events in a virus pandemic

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in May 2021, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

The COVID-19 pandemic in New South Wales is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first confirmed case in New South Wales was identified on 19 January 2020 in Sydney where three travellers returning from Wuhan, Hubei, China, tested positive for the virus.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Victoria is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first confirmed case in the Australian state of Victoria was identified on 19 January 2020, when a man returning from Wuhan, Hubei, China, tested positive for the virus.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Western Australia is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Western Australia (WA) confirmed its first case of COVID-19 on 21 February 2020, and its first death on 1 March. On 15 March, premier Mark McGowan declared a state of emergency. On 24 March, Western Australia closed its borders to the rest of Australia, and on 1 April, the state implemented borders between regions in the state. By mid-April, the state had eliminated community transmission of COVID-19, becoming one of the few places in the world to do so. Since then, there have only been a handful of cases of community transmission in Western Australia.

The COVID-19 pandemic in South Australia is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Australian Capital Territory is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. After one case of the delta variant in mid-August 2021, the Territory went into lockdown. As of 5 September 2021 there are 237 active cases of delta variant COVID-19 in the ACT.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Northern Territory is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Tasmania is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during 2020.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during the first half of 2021.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during the second half of 2021.

Protests over responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have occurred around the world. There have been several protests against lockdowns and other restrictions introduced by the Commonwealth and state governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia since 2020. Some joining protests have also been against vaccinations, while others have also subscribed to various conspiracy theories or misinformation about COVID-19. Protests have been held in several state capitals, with most occurring in including Sydney and Melbourne. While some protests were peaceful, others ended in clashes between protesters and police. Australian police have issued fines against protesters for breaching lockdown restrictions.

References

  1. "Queensland first to make emergency declarations in January – The Queensland Cabinet and Ministerial Directory". statements.qld.gov.au. Archived from the original on 16 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  2. "View – Queensland Legislation – Queensland Government". legislation.qld.gov.au. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  3. "View – Queensland Legislation – Austlii (Australian Legal Information Institute) Database". austlii.edu.au. Retrieved 31 July 2021.
  4. "View - Australian Government - Department of Health" (PDF). health.gov.au/resources/collections/coronavirus-covid-19-at-a-glance-infographic-collection. Retrieved 31 July 2021.
  5. "Home Confinement, Movement and Gathering Direction". Queensland Health. Queensland Government. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  6. "Non-essential business, activity and undertaking Closure Direction (No.5)". Queensland Health. Queensland Government. 9 April 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  7. "Queensland border closure". COVID-19 Government Actions. Queensland Government. 11 April 2020.
  8. "Border restrictions Direction (No.4)". Queensland Health. Queensland Government. 10 April 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  9. "Important updates: coronavirus (COVID-19)". Parks and forests. Queensland Government. 8 April 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  10. "Restricting cruise ships from entering Queensland waters Direction". Queensland Health. Queensland Government. 7 April 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  11. "Three beaches to be closed". Search form Search City of Gold Coast. Search form Search City of Gold Coast. 6 April 2020. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  12. Marian Faa (15 April 2020). "Torres Strait residents fighting to get home given 'no warning' of COVID-19 travel restrictions". Australian Broadcasting Corporation . Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  13. Kleyn, Brittney (31 January 2021). "Queensland drops restrictions to every state and territory except WA with holiday-makers encouraged to make plans for Easter". www.abc.net.au. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  14. Stevenson, Ashleigh (22 February 2021). "COVID-19 vaccine rollout begins in Queensland, as nurses, police inspector receive first jabs on the Gold Coast". www.abc.net.au. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. AAP. Retrieved 13 March 2021.
  15. McGhee, Rachel (28 February 2021). "Queensland finally gets a coronavirus tracing app to replace 'onerous' old system". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 1 March 2021.
  16. "Brisbane hospital locked down after doctor tests positive for COVID-19". www.abc.net.au. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 12 March 2021. Retrieved 12 March 2021.
  17. Noble, Freya; Pearson, Nick (24 June 2021). "State-by-state travel restrictions as NSW outbreak grows". 9News. Nine Digital Pty Ltd. Retrieved 24 June 2021.
  18. Nick Pearson (8 January 2021). "Greater Brisbane lockdown rules explained". nine.com.au. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
  19. Siganto, Talissa (8 January 2021). "Greater Brisbane is in a three-day lockdown. These are the rules". www.abc.net.au. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
  20. Nothling, Lily (29 March 2021). "Greater Brisbane officially plunged into three-day coronavirus lockdown". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  21. Vujkovic, Melanie (29 March 2021). "Eight new locally acquired cases overnight as Greater Brisbane enters first day in lockdown". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 30 March 2021.
  22. 1 2 3 4 Stewart, Jessica (31 March 2021). "Brisbane's lockdown lifted early after just one case of community transmission". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 1 April 2021.
  23. 1 2 3 Cramsie, Elizabeth; and, staff (28 June 2021). "Three new COVID cases recorded in Queensland, including two detected in the community". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting corporation. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  24. 1 2 3 Ruddick, Baz (29 June 2021). "Queenslanders heading for three-day lockdown after unvaccinated hospital worker tests positive to COVID-19". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  25. 1 2 3 "Brisbane hospital worker confirmed as having highly infectious Delta strain of COVID-19 as Queensland lockdown begins". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 29 June 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  26. 1 2 3 Stewart, Jessica (22 July 2021). "Queensland-NSW border shuts as part of COVID restrictions shake-up. Here are the new rules to live by". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  27. "Thousands rally in Brisbane against lockdowns and masks as the state records no new cases". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 24 July 2021. Retrieved 24 July 2021.
  28. "NSW Police set up strike force to find anti-lockdown protesters after thousands shut down Sydney CBD". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 24 July 2021. Retrieved 25 July 2021.
  29. "Six new COVID cases linked to Brisbane high school student confirmed, prompting snap lockdown in south-east Queensland". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 31 July 2021. Retrieved 31 July 2021.
  30. Riga, Rachel (1 August 2021). "Queensland records nine locally acquired COVID-19 cases as Delta cluster centred on Brisbane schools grows". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  31. Nothling, Lily; & staff (2 August 2021). "Queensland records 15 new cases of COVID-19 as lockdown is extended". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  32. 1 2 "2020 Ekka Cancelled". Royal National Agricultural and Industrial Association of Queensland. Archived from the original on 6 April 2020. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  33. 1 2 Hewson, Georgie (2 August 2021). "Producers, exhibitors reeling as massive Brisbane show Ekka is cancelled with just days to go". ABC Southern Qld. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  34. "South-east Queensland's lockdown lifts after seven new cases linked to school cluster". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 8 August 2021. Retrieved 9 August 2021.
  35. Ross, Jessica; Vujkovic, Melanie (8 August 2021). "Cairns plunged into three-day lockdown over 'unexpected' COVID-19 case". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 9 August 2021.
  36. Newstead, Al (16 March 2020). "Big Pineapple Music Festival postponed due to coronavirus". triple j. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 19 February 2021.
  37. Newstead, Al (28 August 2020). "Big Pineapple Music Festival won't happen in November, reschedules to 2021". triple j. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 19 February 2021.
  38. Kuper, Stephen (10 May 2020). "Land Forces 2020 decision announced". www.defenceconnect.com.au. Retrieved 19 January 2021.
  39. "How Australians marked New Year's Eve in a year dominated by COVID-19". ABC News. Australia. 1 January 2020. Retrieved 3 February 2021. Coronavirus restrictions have largely determined how millions of people across Australia have seen in 2021.
  40. Bernard, Kimberley; Cumming, Sarah (16 February 2021). "World Surf League confirms Gold Coast Corona Open to relocate to Sydney due to pandemic". ABC Gold Coast. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 17 February 2021.
  41. "Walking Tours | Brisbane Open | Cultural Tours".
  42. Grounds, Ellie (9 August 2021). "Birdsville Races called off due to COVID-19 for second year in a row, postponed to April 2022". ABC Western Qld. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 9 August 2021.
  43. Lamond, Scott (22 July 2021). "COVID-19 clampdown sees popular music festival cancelled". ABC Wide Bay. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 15 August 2021. We would put the entire future of this festival in jeopardy if we charged ahead this year ….", and "… it was simply too risky with most patrons and artists coming from outside of Queensland – Greg Cavanagh, chairman of Gympie Music Muster, re. 2021 cancellation
  44. 1 2 "Cases: States and Territories". covid19data.com.au. Retrieved 21 July 2021.