COVID-19 pandemic in South Australia

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in South Australia
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location South Australia, Australia
First outbreak Wuhan, Hubei, China
Confirmed cases922 (as of 19 November 2021)
Active cases2 (as of 19 November 2021)
Hospitalised cases0 (as of 19 November 2021)
Critical cases0 (as of 19 November 2021)
Recovered916 (as of 19 November 2021)
Deaths
4 (as of 19 November 2021)
Fatality rate0.43%
Government website
www.covid-19.sa.gov.au

The COVID-19 pandemic in South Australia is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 ( COVID-19 ) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Contents

Timeline

A "pool closed" sign outside the Marion Outdoor Swimming Centre in Park Holme, South Australia, April 2020 Pool closure, COVID-19 (March 2020).jpg
A "pool closed" sign outside the Marion Outdoor Swimming Centre in Park Holme, South Australia, April 2020

2020

On 11 March, the SA state government announced its A$350 million economic stimulus measures. [1]

On 15 March, a public health emergency was declared in South Australia. [2]

On 22 March, a "major emergency" was declared, giving the police power to enforce self-isolation rules. [3]

On 24 March, state borders were closed. People arriving in the state were required to sign a declaration that they would self-isolate for 14 days and provide an address to the police, with penalties for failure to comply. [3] [4]

On 27 March, a direction was made under the Emergency Management Act 2004 [5] to prohibit gatherings of more than 10 people, and a limit of 1 person per four square metres. [6]

On 8 November the SA government announced that in the state budget it would double it's coronavirus economic stimulus package to AU$ 4 billion. [7]

On 16 November, "a number of significant restrictions" were reintroduced after an outbreak of coronavirus in the northern suburbs of Adelaide. [8]

Woodville outbreak

On 17 November, a six-day lockdown from midnight that day was announced. Afterwards there was to be another eight days of "significant restrictions" according to Police Commissioner Grant Stevens. [9] On 21 November, Premier Steven Marshall announced that the state's "circuit breaker" restrictions would be ending three days earlier on 21 November after authorities discovered that one of the positive cases at the Woodville Pizza Bar coronavirus hotspot had misled contact tracers by concealing the fact that he worked at the shop. As part of the easing of "circuit breaker restrictions", groups of 50 people were allowed to attend private functions and funerals, ten people to attend private functions, and 100 people allowed to attend restaurants and pubs. [10] [11]

2021

On 12 February 2021, the World Solar Challenge (SWC) for that year was cancelled by the SA Government. [12]

On 5 March 2021, the first Australian received the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. A doctor in regional South Australia, she was dosed at Murray Bridge Hospital. [13]

On 30 April, South Australia's first COVID-19 mass vaccination hub opened at Adelaide Showground. [14]

In mid-June, sniffer dogs were deployed on a trial basis at Adelaide Airport to detect people with COVID-19 infections. [15]

Due to a growing cluster in Bondi, Sydney, on 23 June South Australia "immediately" reinstated a hard border with NSW. No one who had been in NSW in the past 14 days was allowed entry to SA. A border buffer of 100km was in place. Exemption were available for residents returning to SA, essential travellers, and special cases. [16] [17]

On 28 June, from midnight, SA pre-emptively re-introduced a number of restrictions for at least 7 days: [18]

On 11 July, a 72-year-old woman with thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) died in Royal Adelaide Hospital. She was vaccinated with AstraZeneca on 24 June, then admitted on 5 July. [19]

On 19 July, from midnight "level 4" restrictions were introduced after a traveller from overseas (via quarantine and hospital in Sydney) and two close contacts all tested positive. The restrictions were due to be reviewed on 23 July. [20] Restrictions included:

Lockdown

On 20 July, from 6pm, South Australia went into lockdown for 7 days. This was after a 5 case cluster of the Delta variant emerged linked to Modbury Hospital. By this date, approximately 3,000 people were in quarantine at home. [21] The only reasons to leave home were: [21]

  • essential work
  • care for someone
  • purchase essential goods-food,
  • exercise
    • only with people from the same household
    • within 2.5 kilometres of home
    • 90 minutes per day maximum
  • healthcare (including vaccination and COVID testing)
    • elective surgery on hold
  • Schools to close from 21 July
    • 24-hour transition period for teachers to arrange at-home learning
  • construction work to be halted. [21]

The lockdown led to panic buying, and the cancellations of AVCon, the Royal Adelaide Show, the Adelaide Beer and Barbeque Festival, Winter Reds wine festival and the Illuminate Adelaide arts festival. [22] The reopening of the Gawler railway line, originally set for November 2021, was also delayed to early 2022. [23]

Event cancellations

Statistics

COVID-19 cumulative cases in South Australia [36]

COVID-19 daily cases in South Australia [36]

See also

Related Research Articles

COVID-19 pandemic in Australia Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Australia

The COVID-19 pandemic in Australia is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first confirmed case in Australia was identified on 25 January 2020, in Victoria, when a man who had returned from Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, tested positive for the virus.

National responses to the COVID-19 pandemic Internal responses of the nations of the world

National responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have been varied, and have included containment measures such as lockdowns, quarantines, and curfews. As of 19 November 2021, 256,072,650 cases of COVID-19 have been reported, resulting in 5,132,202 reported deaths. The most affected countries in terms of confirmed cases are the United States, Brazil, India, Russia, South Africa, Peru, Mexico, Chile, the United Kingdom, and Iran.

COVID-19 pandemic in Fiji Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Fiji

The COVID-19 pandemic in Fiji is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first case of the disease in Fiji was reported on 19 March 2020 in Lautoka. As of 18 October 2021, the country has had a total of 51,846 cases as of which 2,288 are currently active and 663 deaths, with cases reported on the main islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, and outer islands of Malolo, Naviti, Ovalau, Gau, Beqa and Kadavu. Apart from the COVID-19 deaths, 547 COVID-19 positive patients have died from pre-existing non-COVID-19 related illnesses. In March 2021, Fiji became the first Pacific island country to receive COVID-19 vaccines through the COVAX initiative with frontline workers and first responders the first to be vaccinated. As of 17 October 2021, out of the target population of 618,173, more than 590,000 (96%) Fijians have received their first jab of the vaccine and almost 500,000 (84%) Fijians have received their second jab and are fully vaccinated. To date, only the AstraZeneca vaccine, Moderna vaccine and the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine have been deployed in the country. Vaccination is mandated, however only to the adult population.

COVID-19 lockdowns Restrictions imposed during COVID-19 pandemic

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of non-pharmaceutical interventions colloquially known as lockdowns have been implemented in numerous countries and territories around the world. These restrictions were established to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. By April 2020, about half of the world's population was under some form of lockdown, with more than 3.9 billion people in more than 90 countries or territories having been asked or ordered to stay at home by their governments. Although similar disease control measures have been used for hundreds of years, the scale seen in the 2020s is thought to be unprecedented.

This article includes detailed statistics of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in November 2020

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in November 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

COVID-19 vaccination in Australia Ongoing COVID-19 vaccine program in Australia

The general COVID-19 vaccination in Australia program began on 22 February 2021 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and will continue with the goal of vaccinating all willing Australians before 2022. Front-line workers and aged care staff and residents will be the first Australians to be inoculated, before a gradual phased release to less-vulnerable and lower-risk population groups throughout 2021. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) approved four vaccines for Australian use in 2021: the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine on 25 January, the Oxford–AstraZeneca vaccine on 16 February, Janssen vaccine on 25 June and the Moderna vaccine on 9 August. Although approved for use, the Janssen vaccine is not included in the Australian vaccination program.

The following table outlines the COVID-19 clusters detected in Australia from the start of the pandemic until 5 November 2021, when Australia entered the consolidation phase of its COVID-19 transition plan by reaching an 80 percent vaccination target of the eligible Australian population. COVID-19 clusters are cases that are known to be related by close contacts. A single cluster may have cases in multiple locations. Some smaller clusters are known to be linked to larger clusters. A cluster may be investigated for days before being announced for the first time.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in May 2021 Sequence of major events in a virus pandemic

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in May 2021, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

The COVID-19 pandemic in New South Wales is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first confirmed case in New South Wales was identified on 19 January 2020 in Sydney where three travellers returning from Wuhan, Hubei, China, tested positive for the virus.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Victoria is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first confirmed case in the state of Victoria, also the first in Australia, was identified as being on 19 January 2020, when a man arrived by air from Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. He later tested positive for the virus.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Queensland is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Western Australia is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Western Australia (WA) confirmed its first case of COVID-19 on 21 February 2020, and its first death on 1 March. On 15 March, premier Mark McGowan declared a state of emergency. On 24 March, Western Australia closed its borders to the rest of Australia, and on 1 April, the state implemented borders between regions in the state. By mid-April, the state had eliminated community transmission of COVID-19, becoming one of the few places in the world to do so. Since then, there have only been a handful of cases of community transmission in Western Australia.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Australian Capital Territory is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. After one case of the delta variant in mid-August 2021, the Territory went into lockdown. By 26 September, the ACT had its first COVID-19 related death since mid-April 2020, nearly 18 months, followed by 3 more deaths in the first week of October 2021. As of 16 October 2021 there were 495 active cases of delta variant COVID-19 in the ACT. 8 deaths during the outbreak since 12 August 2021 brought total deaths to 11.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Northern Territory is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Tasmania is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during 2020.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during the first half of 2021.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during the second half of 2021.

COVID-19 protests in Australia Protests against restrictions introduced in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia

Protests over responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have occurred around the world. There have been several protests against lockdowns and other restrictions introduced by the Commonwealth and state governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia since 2020. Some joining protests have also been against vaccinations, while others have also subscribed to various conspiracy theories or misinformation about COVID-19. Protests have been held in several state capitals, with most occurring in including Sydney and Melbourne. While some protests were peaceful, others ended in clashes between protesters and police. Australian police have issued fines against protesters for breaching lockdown restrictions.

References

  1. Dayman, Isabel (11 March 2020). "New coronavirus cases confirmed as SA Premier announces $350m stimulus package". www.abc.net.au. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 31 January 2021.
  2. Keane, Daniel (15 March 2020). "Coronavirus prompts declaration of public health emergency in South Australia". ABC News. Archived from the original on 22 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  3. 1 2 "South Australia to close borders and require all arrivals to self-isolate". 9 News. 22 March 2020. Archived from the original on 22 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  4. Wills, Daniel; Smith, Matt; Hough, Andrew (22 March 2020). "Premier Steven Marshall will isolate SA as coronavirus surges". The Advertiser. Archived from the original on 21 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  5. "Emergency Management Act 2004". South Australian Legislation. Government of South Australia. Attorney-General's Dept. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  6. "Prohibited Gatherings of People in South Australia (New Declaration COVID-19)". South Australia Police. 27 March 2020. Archived from the original on 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  7. "SA Budget to include 'single biggest' stimulus to help businesses through pandemic". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 8 November 2020. Retrieved 21 July 2021.
  8. Martin, Patrick (16 November 2020). "Coronavirus restrictions to be reintroduced in SA from midnight, but no cluster growth". ABC News . Australian Broadcasting Corporation . Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  9. Siebert, Benson; Brice, Rebecca (18 November 2020). "South Australia ordered into major six-day lockdown amid COVID-19 outbreak". ABC News . Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 18 November 2020. Retrieved 18 November 2020.
  10. Dillon, Meagan; Boisvert, Eugene (20 November 2020). "South Australia to end coronavirus lockdown three days early after pizza worker's 'lie'". ABC News . Archived from the original on 20 November 2020. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  11. Bermingham, Kathryn (21 November 2020). "Covid 19 coronavirus: South Australia comes out of lockdown early after lie discovered". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  12. 1 2 "2021 Challenge Update". worldsolarchallenge.org. South Australian Tourist Commission. 12 February 2021. Retrieved 13 February 2021. The 16th edition of the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge will not go ahead from 22–30 October this year.
  13. "South Australian doctor receives first AstraZeneca vaccination shot in Australia". www.abc.net.au. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 5 March 2021. Retrieved 5 March 2021.
  14. "First South Australian mass COVID-19 vaccination hub opens at Adelaide Showground, with bookings essential". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 30 April 2021. Retrieved 20 May 2021.
  15. "Dogs deployed to sniff out coronavirus cases among airport arrivals". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 17 June 2021. Retrieved 21 June 2021.
  16. Noble, Freya; Pearson, Nick (24 June 2021). "State-by-state travel restrictions as NSW outbreak grows". 9News. Nine Digital Pty Ltd. Retrieved 24 June 2021.
  17. Nguyen, Kevin (24 June 2021). "Bondi COVID-19 cluster rises to 36 cases after NSW Health records 11 new infections". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
  18. 1 2 3 Fedorowytsch, Tom; Tomevska, Sara; Keane, Daniel (28 June 2021). "SA reimposes sweeping social restrictions amid coronavirus outbreaks". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  19. "South Australian woman dies from rare blood clots after receiving AstraZeneca vaccine". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 12 July 2021. Retrieved 12 July 2021.
  20. 1 2 3 MacLennan, Leah; Opie, Rebecca; Keane, Daniel (19 July 2021). "SA significantly intensifies restrictions as traveller and two contacts test positive for COVID-19". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  21. 1 2 3 "South Australia 'moves into lockdown' after five COVID cases associated with Modbury Hospital cluster". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 20 July 2021. Retrieved 20 July 2021.
  22. Keane, Daniel; Rebecca, Opie (20 July 2021). "SA's COVID-19 lockdown will hit businesses hard, but the Premier is promising support". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 21 July 2021.
  23. "SA's COVID-19 lockdown blamed for another delay to Gawler train line electrification". ABC News. 3 August 2021. Retrieved 29 August 2021.
  24. "SANFL UPDATE RE CORONAVIRUS". SANFL. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  25. "COVID-19 Update – 13/03/20". Basketball SA. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  26. "COVID-19 Update – NBL1 Central 14/03/20". Basketball SA. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  27. "SA Schools Head of the River – CANCELLED". rowingsa.asn.au. Rowing South Australia. Retrieved 14 March 2020.
  28. "Royal Adelaide Show cancelled during coronavirus pandemic". 7NEWS.com.au. 14 April 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  29. "Coronavirus forces cancellation of Royal Adelaide Show to protect public health". .abc.net.au/. 14 April 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  30. "Royal Adelaide Show cancelled due to ongoing coronavirus restrictions, Premier Steven Marshall says". abc.net.au/. 12 August 2021. Retrieved 12 August 2021.
  31. Bradbrook, Sam; Stephens, Matt (19 August 2021). "Riverland Field Days cancelled again despite early hope it would go ahead". ABC Riverland. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 19 August 2021.
  32. "How Australians marked New Year's Eve in a year dominated by COVID-19". ABC News. Australia. 1 January 2020. Retrieved 3 February 2021. Coronavirus restrictions have largely determined how millions of people across Australia have seen in 2021.
  33. "COVID-19 leads to cancellation of Tour Down Under cycling race for second year running". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 30 September 2021. Retrieved 1 October 2021.
  34. Marsh, Walter (4 May 2020). "OzAsia Festival appoints new artistic director following 2020 program cancellation". The Adelaide Review . Opinion Media. Retrieved 19 November 2021.
  35. "OzAsia Festival forced to cancel five shows". InDaily . Solstice Media. 17 September 2021. Retrieved 19 November 2021.
  36. 1 2 "Cases: States and Territories". covid19data.com.au. Retrieved 21 July 2021.