California government response to the COVID-19 pandemic

Last updated

Map of the outbreak in California by confirmed new infections per 100,000 people over 14 days (last updated March 2021)
.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}
1,000+
500-1,000
200-500
100-200
50-100
20-50
10-20
0-10
No confirmed new cases or no/bad data COVID-19 rolling 14day Prevalence in California by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in California by confirmed new infections per 100,000 people over 14 days (last updated March 2021)
  1,000+
  500–1,000
  200–500
  100–200
  50–100
  20–50
  10–20
  0–10
  No confirmed new cases or no/bad data
Map of the outbreak in California by confirmed total infections per 100,000 people (last updated March 2021)
10,000+
3,000-10,000
1,000-3,000
300-1,000
100-300
30-100
0-30
No confirmed infected or no data COVID-19 Prevalence in California by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in California by confirmed total infections per 100,000 people (last updated March 2021)
  10,000+
  3,000–10,000
  1,000–3,000
  300–1,000
  100–300
  30–100
  0–30
  No confirmed infected or no data

The government of California initially responded to the COVID-19 pandemic in the state with a statewide lockdown, the first of its kind during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. As the pandemic progressed in California and throughout the rest of the country, the California government, following recommendations issued by the U.S. government regarding state and local government responses, began imposing social distancing measures and workplace hazard controls.

Contents

Background

On December 31, 2019, China reported a cluster of pneumonia cases in its city of Wuhan. On January 7, 2020, the Chinese health authorities confirmed that this cluster was caused by a novel infectious coronavirus. [1] On January 8, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued an official health advisory via its Health Alert Network (HAN) and established an Incident Management Structure to coordinate domestic and international public health actions. [2] On January 10 and 11, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned about a strong possibility of human-to-human transmission and urged precautions. [3] On January 20, the WHO and China confirmed that human-to-human transmission had occurred. [4]

On January 26, 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the first case in California. The person, who had returned from travel to Wuhan, China, was released from the hospital in Orange County on February 1 in good condition to in-home isolation. [5] On January 31, the CDC confirmed the state's second case, a man in Santa Clara County, who had recently traveled to Wuhan. [6] The man recovered at home and was released from in-home isolation on February 20. [7] On February 6, 2020, a woman from San Jose, California, became the first COVID-19 death in the U.S., though this was not discovered until April 2020. The case indicated community transmission was happening undetected in the state and the U.S., most likely since December. [8] [9]

State government

2020

February

Newsom announced that, as of February 27,2020, the number of people being monitored for the virus in California amounted to 8,400. [10]

On February 27, the governor announced that the state was limited in testing for the new coronavirus because it had only 200 testing kits. [11]

March

A Wireless Emergency Alert sent by Santa Clara County, California about the shelter-in-place order COVID-19 Santa Clara County shelter-in-place order notification.png
A Wireless Emergency Alert sent by Santa Clara County, California about the shelter-in-place order

On March 4, the governor declared a state of emergency after the first death in California attributable to coronavirus occurred in Placer County. [12] [13] [14]

On March 12, Newsom announced that mass gatherings (over 250 people) and social gatherings (more than 10 people) were banned until the end of March. [15] He also issued an order to permit the state to commandeer hotels and medical facilities to treat coronavirus patients. [16] [17] [18] [19] On March 13, schools were closed in Marin, Sacramento, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Santa Clara, Solano, Placer, and Contra Costa counties, as well as the Oakland, Antioch, Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Unified, Chaffey Unified, Etiwanda, Fontana Unified, Ontario-Montclair, Alta Loma Unified, San Diego, Los Alamitos Unified, and Washington Unified school districts. In Santa Clara county, all gatherings of 100 or more people were banned, and gatherings of 35 or more people were banned unless they satisfied public health restrictions. [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [ excessive citations ] Press reports in April suggest that the aggressive early imposition of social-distancing orders by Santa Clara County were the result of community surveillance performed beginning on March 5. [25]

Executive Order N-33-20: the March 19 stay-at-home order from California governor Gavin Newsom California Executive Order N-33-20.pdf
Executive Order N-33-20: the March 19 stay-at-home order from California governor Gavin Newsom

On March 15, Newsom called for voluntary closure of bars and in-home self-isolation of seniors 65 and older, as well as persons at-risk due to underlying conditions. [26] On March 16, the health officers of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, and Santa Clara counties announced, with the City of Berkeley, a legal order directing their respective residents to shelter in place for three weeks beginning midnight March 17 to April 7 in order to slow the spread of the coronavirus. [27] The order limited activity, travel and business functions to only the most essential needs. [28] [29] [30] The same day, the county of Santa Cruz issued a similar shelter in place order. [31]

On March 17, more counties issued shelter in place orders, including Monterey County (until April 4), [32] San Benito (until April 7), [33] and Sonoma (until April 7). [34] The federal Defense Secretary said the military would provide up to 5 million respirator masks and also 2,000 ventilators from its reserve. [35]

On March 18, shelter in place orders were issued by Yolo County (until April 7), [36] the city of Fresno (until March 31), [37] Napa County (effective March 20, until April 7) [38] San Luis Obispo County (until April 17), [39] and Mendocino County (until April 7). [40] The Department of Defense said the Navy's hospital ship USNS Mercy is being prepared for deployment in California, "to assist potentially overwhelmed communities with acute patient care". [41]

On March 19, Newsom then announced a statewide stay-at-home order. [42] [43] [44] Newsom said that the state has asked the Department of Defense to deploy the Navy's USNS Mercy hospital ship in California. [45]

On March 20, Governor Newsom deployed the California National Guard to provide assistance to food banks in California. [46]

On March 21, the Strategic National Stockpile Division of the United States Department of Health and Human Services converted the Santa Clara Convention Center into a Federal Medical Station to receive noncritical patients from local hospitals. [47]

On March 22, President Trump announced that he had directed Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide 8 large federal medical stations with 2,000 beds for California. [48]

On March 24, Newsom passed an executive order to postpone intakes in prisons and juvenile correction centers. The objective was to hinder contamination in the prison system. [49] Also on March 24, the California State Guard was deployed alongside the California National Guard in San Mateo County to provide emergency prehospital response for patients. [50]

April

On April 1, Newsom announced the closure of all public and private schools for the remainder of the 2019–2020 academic year, including all institutions of higher education, and directing all schools to "put all efforts into strengthening our delivery of education through distance learning." [51] The University of California system announced that they would temporarily suspend the use of standardized testing for Fall 2021 admissions, and suspend the letter grade requirement for A-G courses completed in winter, spring, and summer 2020. [52]

A sign outside a store in Los Angeles County on April 17 requiring all customers to wear face coverings to enter Retail Masquerade.jpg
A sign outside a store in Los Angeles County on April 17 requiring all customers to wear face coverings to enter

On April 7, Newsom announced that the state has secured a deal that will provide upwards of 200 million masks, including 150 million N95 masks, per month to the state. [53]

On April 9, Newsom announced the state would pay for hotel rooms for hospital and other essential workers afraid of returning home and infecting family members. [54]

On April 13, Newsom, together with Oregon governor Kate Brown and Washington governor Jay Inslee, announced the Western States Pact, an agreement to coordinate among the three states to restart economic activity while controlling the outbreak. [55]

On April 15, Newsom announced that undocumented immigrants can receive $500 per adult or $1,000 per household. [56] The total cost will be $75 million that will be distributed by nonprofit organizations. [57]

On April 22, Newsom ordered a review on autopsies of people who died in December 2019 in order to find out when COVID-19 arrived in California. [58]

On April 24, Newsom announced a program that will deliver free meals to elderly residents who meet the program's requirements. This program partners with local restaurants to deliver up to $61 worth of meals per day to each qualified resident. 75% of the program's cost will be covered by FEMA, and the rest will be covered by the state and local governments. [59]

On April 29, Newsom announced an expansion of the state's Farm to Family program, which helps connect farmers to food banks. The governor also announced that the state's CalFresh program will continue to send every recipient the maximum amount of benefits for May. Newsom also said that families with kids who can receive free or low-cost lunch at schools could now get up to $365 a month in additional benefits due to the Pandemic-EBT program. Additionally, Newsom announced that EBT cards could be used to buy groceries online on Amazon and Walmart, and the state was encouraging other supermarkets to also accept EBTs for online purchasing. [60]

Person wearing a mask in Chinatown, San Francisco, California Coronavirus COVID-19 Chinatown, San Francisco, California.jpg
Person wearing a mask in Chinatown, San Francisco, California

May

By May, Newsom had come under pressure to reopen, e.g. via over a dozen lawsuits filed by lawyer Harmeet Dhillon, who later credited herself for "large sectors of California's economy opening up much sooner than the governor originally intended." [61]

On May 2, the Washington Post reported that a vitamins executive claimed that (at a previous time not specified in the article) Trump had given him Newsom's phone number for the purpose of persuading the governor to buy hydroxychloroquine as a proposed treatment for COVID-19. Newsom declined the proposal to buy millions of hydroxychloroquine tablets, at cost, from an Indian manufacturer. [62]

On May 6, Newsom signed an executive order to extend workers' compensation for all workers who contracted COVID-19 during the state's stay-at-home order. This order was to be retroactive to March 19, when the state's stay-at-home order was issued. Newsom also signed an executive order that waived property tax penalties for residents and small businesses that have been negatively affected by the pandemic. [63]

On May 7, Newsom announced that the state was moving into Stage 2 of its four-stage reopening roadmap. Stage 2 allows for certain low-risk sectors of the economy to reopen, so long as there are significant safety measures in place. [64]

On May 8, Newsom signed an executive order to send every registered voter a mail-in ballot for the 2020 general election. [65]

On May 18, the Department of Public Health announced that counties could selectively reopen types of business that are part of Stage 3 of the state's four-stage reopening roadmap. To reopen certain types of business, a county would attest to its readiness. [66]

On May 26, the Department of Public Health announced that hair service businesses could reopen with restrictions. [67]

June

On June 5, the Department of Public Health noted that many counties were ready to move ahead into Stage 3 of the state's four-stage reopening roadmap. [68] Stage 3 allows for certain higher-risk businesses to reopen with safety and hygiene modifications like seating capacity and regular cleaning in restaurants, bars, theaters, gyms and hair salons. [69]

On June 12, the Department of Public Health released guidance for expanding the operations of personal care service businesses. [70]

On June 18, the Department of Public Health issued universal masking guidance. Counties may follow this guidance to require the wearing of cloth face coverings by all individuals over the age of 2 in all public indoor settings, and in outdoor settings when social distancing is not possible. Exemptions are provided for restaurants (if social distancing is maintained), inmates, and people with specific medical conditions that prevent their use. Newsom stated that "science shows that face coverings and masks work". [71] [72]

By late June, The New York Times observed an "alarming surge in cases" in California that was forcing Newsom to roll back the reopening in several counties. [61]

On June 26, Newsom said he was "committed to intervening" if Imperial County officials did not reimpose stay-at-home orders in the Mexican border region where positive rates averaged 23% while the nationwide average was 5.7%. [73]

On June 28, Newsom ordered bars closed in seven counties: Los Angeles, Fresno, Kern, San Joaquin, Tulare, Kings, and Imperial. [74]

July

On July 1, Newsom ordered the closure of most indoor businesses, including restaurants, wineries, and movie theaters, in Contra Costa, Fresno, Glenn, Imperial, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Merced, Orange, Riverside, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Solano, Stanislaus, Tulare, and Ventura counties. [75]

On July 13, Newsom re-imposed the closure of gyms, indoor dining, bars, movie theaters, and museums, citing an increase in cases. [76] [77]

By July 2020, California had the highest number of confirmed cases in the United States. In June, the state surpassed the 200,000 and in July 2020, 300,000 and again, 400,000 mark, about one percent infection rate per population for the state's 40 million residents. When the state rolled back reopening on July 13, the Mexican border county of Imperial was suggested on June 26 by the state government to restore their stay-at-home order. [78]

August

The State of California's describes wildfire evacuation COVID-19-related protocols in August 2020.

On August 18, San Diego and Santa Cruz were removed from the state watchlist, now consisting of 42 counties. [79] On August 24, Orange, Napa, Calaveras, Mono, and Sierra were removed from the state watchlist. [80]

On August 28, Newsom unveiled the Blueprint for a Safer Economy — a new set of guidelines for lifting restrictions, designed to be "simple, stringent and slow". The Blueprint replaced the state watchlist with a four-tiered, color-coded classification system. These levels are based on the number of daily cases per-100,000 residents, and the current test positivity rate. To progress to a lower level, a county must remain within its required metrics for at least 21 days. A county may be rolled back to a higher tier if its numbers trend into its metrics over a 14-day period. These state orders may still be superseded by stricter county health orders. [81] [82]

Changes in tier status take effect the day after they are formally announced, although local governments can delay a transition to a lower level as they choose.

Initial "Blueprint for a Safer Economy" criteria (August 28, 2020) [81] [82] [83]
LevelCases per 100KCounty-wide test positivityBusinesses allowed to open
Widespread (purple)>7>8%
Substantial (red)4–75–8%piercing shops, tattoo parlors
indoors: personal care services, fitness/dance/yoga studios, museums/zoos/aquariums, movie theaters, places of worship, dine-in restaurants
expansion of indoor capacity: stores and shopping malls (25%→50%)
Moderate (orange)1–3.92–4.9%bars/breweries/distilleries (outdoors only)
indoors: gambling venues, family entertainment centers, swimming pools, wineries
expansion of indoor capacity: fitness/dance/yoga studios (10%→25%); museums/zoos/aquariums, places of worship, movie theaters, dine-in restaurants, weddings (25%→50%); stores and shopping malls (no restrictions)
Minimal (yellow)<1<2%saunas/spas/steam rooms
indoors: bars/breweries/distilleries
expansion of indoor capacity: gambling venues, fitness/dance/yoga studios, family entertainment centers, wineries (25%→50%); museums/zoos/aquariums (no restrictions)

Head of Health and Human Services Mark Ghaly stated that "health equity benchmarks" would also be a factor in classifications, with the Department of Public Health listing "data collection, testing access, contact tracing, supportive isolation, and outreach that demonstrate a county's ability to address the most impacted communities within a county" as metrics under this category. [84] [85] [86]

Initial classifications of counties under Blueprint for a Safer Economy (August 31, 2020) [upper-alpha 1]
ClassificationNumber of countiesPercentage of population represented [upper-alpha 2] List of counties
Widespread3886.57%Alameda, Amador, Butte, Colusa, Contra Costa, Fresno, Glenn, Imperial, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Marin, Mendocino, Merced, Monterey, Orange, Placer, Riverside, Sacramento, San Benito, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Ventura, Yolo, Yuba
Substantial912.13%Calaveras, El Dorado, Lake, Lassen, Napa, Nevada, San Diego, San Francisco, Sierra
Moderate91.28%Del Norte, Humboldt, Mariposa, Mono, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity, Tuolumne
Minimal20.03%Alpine, Modoc

September

September 8 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Amador, Orange, Placer, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz

September 15 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Inyo, Marin, Tehama

September 22 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Alameda, Riverside, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Solano
  • Substantial→Moderate: El Dorado, Lassen, Nevada
  • Moderate→Minimal: Mariposa

September 24 BSE reassignment (special): [upper-alpha 3]

  • Substantial→Moderate: Sierra

September 29 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Butte, Contra Costa, Fresno, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Santa Barbara, Yolo
  • Substantial→Moderate: Amador, Calaveras, San Francisco

As of September 29,2020, a majority of the state's population is under Substantial or lower restrictions. [upper-alpha 2]

October

In early October, the California government added a new "equity metric" to its Blueprint for a Safer Economy. The equity rule relies on the California Healthy Places Index (HPI), which ranks census tracts in California using 25 factors including median household income, unemployment rate, education, voter turnout, tree coverage, health insurance, alcohol availability, and air and water pollution. [87] For counties with a population above 106,000, the reopening of the entire county depends not only on the countywide infection rate but also on the infection rate within census tracts that score in the lowest quartile on the HPI. [88] [89]

October 6 BSE reassignment:

  • Moderate→Substantial: Shasta
  • Substantial→Widespread: Tehama
  • Widespread→Substantial: Merced, Ventura, Yuba
  • Substantial→Moderate: Inyo
  • Moderate→Minimal: Humboldt, Plumas, Siskiyou, Trinity

October 13 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Colusa, Kern, Kings, San Benito, Stanislaus, Sutter
  • Substantial→Moderate: Alameda, Placer, Santa Clara
  • Moderate→Minimal: Sierra

October 20 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Widespread: Riverside, Shasta
  • Substantial→Moderate: Butte, Napa
  • Moderate→Minimal: San Francisco

October 27 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Glenn, Mendocino, Shasta
  • Substantial→Moderate: Contra Costa, Marin, San Mateo, Santa Cruz
  • Moderate→Minimal: Calaveras

November

On November 2, the California Supreme Court had a ruling that involved Sutter County on implementing restrictions on Governor Gavin Newsom's public health emergency powers in the state's 8-month old COVID-19 lockdown. [90]

November 4 BSE reassignment: [upper-alpha 4] [upper-alpha 5]

  • Minimal→Moderate: Plumas, Trinity
  • Moderate→Substantial: Placer
  • Substantial→Widespread: Shasta
  • Substantial→Moderate: Colusa

November 10 BSE reassignment:

  • Minimal→Moderate: Modoc, Siskiyou
  • Moderate→Substantial: Amador, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Santa Cruz
  • Substantial→Widespread: Sacramento, San Diego, Stanislaus

As of November 10,2020, a majority of the population is back up to Widespread restrictions. [upper-alpha 2]

November 16 BSE reassignment: [upper-alpha 6]

  • Minimal→Moderate: Calaveras, Sierra
  • Minimal→Substantial: Humboldt, San Francisco
  • Moderate→Substantial: Colusa, Del Norte, Marin, Modoc, Mono, Plumas, San Mateo
  • Moderate→Widespread: Alameda, Butte, Napa, Nevada, Santa Clara, Siskiyou, Trinity, Tuolumne
  • Substantial→Widespread: Contra Costa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Kern, Kings, Mendocino, Merced, Orange, Placer, San Benito, San Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sutter, Ventura, Yolo, Yuba

Effective November 16, the BSE reassignment uses case data from the previous week (as opposed to two weeks ago). The rule prohibiting moving counties up by more than one tier at a time was also dropped.

On November 19, Newsom announced that a curfew—referred to as a "limited stay-at-home order"—would take effect in all counties in the Widespread tier from November 21 to December 21. The order generally restricts all "non-essential work, movement and gatherings" between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. PST nightly. [91] [92]

November 24 BSE reassignment:

  • Minimal→Moderate: Alpine, Mariposa
  • Moderate→Substantial: Calaveras
  • Moderate→Widespread: Lassen
  • Substantial→Widespread: Colusa, Del Norte, Humboldt
  • Substantial→Moderate: Modoc

As of November 24,2020, every county is under Moderate or higher restrictions.

November 28 BSE reassignment:

  • Moderate→Substantial: Alpine, Inyo, Mariposa
  • Moderate→Widespread: Modoc
  • Substantial→Widespread: Calaveras, Lake, Plumas, San Francisco, San Mateo

December

December 1 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Widespread: Mono

On December 3, Newsom announced a regional stay-at-home order, which divides the state into 5 regions (Northern California, Bay Area, Greater Sacramento, San Joaquin Valley, Southern California). The order will be implemented in any region if the region's ICU capacity falls 15%, and will be in effect for 3 weeks at a time. [93] [94] [upper-alpha 2] [95]

  • Northern California (1.73% of population): Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity
  • Bay Area (21.38% of population): Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma
  • Greater Sacramento (7.45% of population): Alpine, Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba
  • San Joaquin Valley (11.25% of population): Calaveras, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, San Benito, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare, Tuolumne
  • Southern California (58.19% of population): Imperial, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura

On December 6 at 11:59 p.m., the regional stay-at-home order went into effect for the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California regions.

December 8 BSE reassignment: [upper-alpha 7]

  • Substantial→Widespread: Amador, Marin

On December 10 at 11:59 p.m., the regional stay-at-home order went into effect for the Greater Sacramento region.

December 15 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Widespread: Inyo

On December 17 at 11:59 p.m., the regional stay-at-home order went into effect for the Bay Area region.

December 22 BSE reassignment: no changes.

December 29 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Humboldt

2021

January

In early January, a campaign to recall Newsom over his response to the pandemic was reported to be gaining momentum. [96]

January 5 BSE reassignment: no changes.

January 12 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Widespread: Humboldt
  • Widespread→Substantial: Trinity

On January 12, the regional stay-at-home order was lifted for the Greater Sacramento region.

January 19 BSE reassignment: no changes.

On January 25, Newsom announced the statewide cancellation of the regional stay-at-home order system. [97] [98] The nighttime curfew for Widespread counties was also lifted.

January 26 BSE reassignment: no changes.

February

February 2 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Alpine, Trinity

On February 6, the Supreme Court of the United States blocked and revised California's ban on indoor religious worship, with an unsigned order that said the total ban is unconstitutional, but allowing the state to restrict attendance to 25% capacity, and upholding the ban on singing and chanting. The decision was 6–3 in favor. [99]

February 9 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Del Norte

February 16 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Plumas

February 23 BSE reassignment:

  • Moderate→Substantial: Trinity
  • Widespread→Substantial: Humboldt, Marin, San Mateo, Shasta, Yolo

On February 23, Newsom signed the $7.6 billion Golden State Stimulus bill which will provide $600 stimulus checks to qualifying residents, $2 billion in grants for small businesses, as well as millions in aid for food banks, low-income community college students, and agricultural workers who may have been exposed to COVID-19. [100]

March

On March 1, Newsom and legislative leaders announced a $6.6 billion aid package aimed at reopening schools. [101] $2 billion will be dedicated to PPE and other necessary safety measures, while $4.6 billion will go to summer schools, tutoring, and mental health services. Additionally, with the penalty of gradually losing access to this aid, public schools are required to offer in-person learning for kindergarten to second grade students and high-needs students in every grade by the end of March. Furthermore, this aid package will allocate 10% of all vaccines for education workers.

March 2 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: El Dorado, Lassen, Modoc, Napa, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Clara

On March 5, California officials announced that theme parks and sports stadiums may reopen with safety precautions on April 1. [102] Theme park capacity will be limited to 15%, 25%, and 35% for counties in the red, orange, and yellow tiers respectively. Stadium capacity will be limited to 100 people, 20% capacity, 33% capacity, and 67% capacity for counties in the purple, red, orange, and yellow tiers respectively. Theme parks will not be allowed to have indoor dining, and there will also be restrictions on indoor rides. For stadiums, concession sales are not allowed in counties in the purple tier, while in-seat concession sales will be allowed for counties in the other tiers. Additionally, for both theme parks and stadiums, attendance will be limited to in-state visitors only.

March 9 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Alameda, Butte, Calaveras, Imperial, Santa Cruz, Solano
  • Substantial→Moderate: Mariposa, Plumas
  • Moderate→Minimal: Alpine

On March 11, state officials announced that breweries, wineries, and distilleries could reopen outdoors statewide as soon as the state reached its goal of 2 million vaccinations to residents in designated disadvantaged ZIP codes. [103]

March 13 BSE reassignment: [upper-alpha 8]

  • Widespread→Substantial: Amador, Colusa, Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Mendocino, Mono, Orange, Placer, San Benito, San Bernardino, Siskiyou, Sonoma, Tuolumne

As of March 13,2021, a majority of the state's population is back under Substantial or lower restrictions. [upper-alpha 2]

March 16 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Lake, Monterey, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Ventura
  • Substantial→Moderate: San Mateo

March 23 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Kern, Nevada, Stanislaus
  • Substantial→Moderate: Lassen, Marin, San Francisco, Santa Clara, Trinity, Yolo
  • Moderate→Minimal: Sierra

March 30 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: Fresno, Glenn, Kings, Madera, Yuba
  • Substantial→Moderate: Alameda, Butte, Colusa, Los Angeles, Modoc, Orange, Santa Cruz, Tuolumne

April

April 6 BSE reassignment:

  • Widespread→Substantial: San Joaquin
  • Substantial→Moderate: Contra Costa, El Dorado, Humboldt, Imperial, Mendocino, Monterey, Napa, Riverside, San Benito, San Bernardino, San Diego, Siskiyou, Sonoma, Tulare, Ventura

As of April 6,2021, a majority of the state's population is under Moderate or lower restrictions. [upper-alpha 2]

On April 6, Governor Newsom announced that the state planned to end most COVID-19 restrictions on June 15, 2021, if certain criteria are met: this includes equitable vaccine availability for all residents 16 years of age and older, and hospitalizations remaining "stable and low". Newsom justified the decision by stating that California "the lowest case rates [and] positivity rates in America." [104] [105] [106]

Head of Health and Human Services Mark Ghaly stated that California will be focusing on vaccination and mandatory masking as opposed to limitations on businesses moving forward; following this change, the Blueprint will "no longer be in effect" in its present form, and most fields of business will be allowed to operate with few restrictions. These changes will take effect simultaneously state-wide. There will still be some indefinite restrictions; the mask mandate will remain in effect, and the state does not plan to immediately allow large multi-day events such as music festivals (although singular concerts will still be allowed). Furthermore, participation in large-scale indoor events such as conventions will be subject to proof of full vaccination or having recently tested negative, and that such events might not be able to operate at a full capacity without this requirement until October 2021. [104] [105]

April 13 BSE reassignment: [upper-alpha 9]

  • Widespread→Substantial: Inyo, Merced
  • Substantial→Moderate: Kern, Lake
  • Moderate→Minimal: Lassen

As of April 13, the entire state's population is at Substantial or lower restrictions.

April 20 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Calaveras, Fresno, Kings, Mono, Santa Barbara

On April 26, Governor Newsom announced that California was sending over 1,100 pieces of oxygen equipment to India as a response to the worsening outbreak in India. [107]

April 27 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Amador, Glenn, San Luis Obispo, Sutter
  • Moderate→Minimal: Mendocino

On April 29, Governor Newsom signed a bill that will give small businesses a $6.2 billion tax cut. [108] Forgiven PPP loans will not be counted as income, and small businesses will also be able to deduct the expenses that those PPP loans paid for.

May

May 4 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Inyo
  • Moderate→Minimal: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Trinity

On May 10, Governor Newsom announced the $100 billion California Comeback Plan. [109] $12 billion will go towards expanding the state's Golden State Stimulus program for more households. Under the plan, households that make under $75,000 and have not received the Golden State Stimulus already will be getting $600. Qualifying households with dependents will receive an additional $500. As a result of the California Comeback Plan, two-thirds of households will be eligible for some sort of stimulus payment. Additionally, the California Comeback Plan allocates $5 billion for rent relief and assistance with water and utility payments. This plan is the largest state tax rebate in American history.

May 11 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Madera
  • Moderate→Minimal: Mono, San Mateo

On May 12, Governor Newsom announced that the state would end its mask mandate on June 15, along with dropping the BSE system, if case numbers remained low. [110]

May 18 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Tehama
  • Moderate→Minimal: Amador, Orange, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz

May 25 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Merced, Placer
  • Moderate→Minimal: Inyo, Mariposa

On May 27, Governor Newsom announced the Vax for the Win incentive program. [111] The program will spend $116.5 million on incentives for Californians to get vaccinated. The first 2 million Californians to get fully vaccinated after the creation of the program will receive a $50 gift card. All Californians who've been vaccinated with at least one dose will be entered into a lottery. 30 Californians will win $50,000 each, and 10 Californians will win $1.5 million each.

June

June 1 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Nevada, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Solano
  • Moderate→Minimal: Marin, Monterey, San Benito, Ventura

June 8 BSE reassignment:

  • Substantial→Moderate: Stanislaus
  • Moderate→Minimal: Alameda, Napa, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara

As of June 8, a majority of the state's population is under Minimal restrictions.

Final "Blueprint for a Safer Economy" (BSE) criteria [81] [82]
LevelCases per 100KCounty-wide test positivityHealth equity metricBusinesses allowed to open (as of April 2,2021)
Widespread (purple)>10>8%>8.1%
Substantial (red)6–105–8%5.3–8.0%piercing shops, tattoo parlors
indoors: personal care services, fitness/dance/yoga studios, museums/zoos/aquariums, movie theaters, dine-in restaurants
expansion of indoor capacity: stores and shopping malls (25%→50%)
gatherings of up to 25 people
Moderate (orange)2–5.92–4.9%2.2–5.2%indoors: bars/breweries/distilleries, gambling venues, family entertainment centers, swimming pools, wineries
expansion of indoor capacity: fitness/dance/yoga studios (10%→25%); museums/zoos/aquariums, places of worship, movie theaters, dine-in restaurants, weddings (25%→50%); stores and shopping malls (no restrictions)
gatherings of up to 50 people
Minimal (yellow)<2<2%<2.2%saunas/spas/steam rooms
expansion of indoor capacity: gambling venues, fitness/dance/yoga studios, family entertainment centers, wineries (25%→50%); museums/zoos/aquariums (no restrictions)
gatherings of up to 100 people
Final classifications of counties under Blueprint for a Safer Economy [112]
ClassificationNumber of countiesPercentage of population represented [upper-alpha 2] [upper-alpha 10] List of counties
Widespread00.00%
Substantial30.73%Del Norte, Shasta, Yuba
Moderate3536.60%Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, Contra Costa, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Humboldt, Imperial, Kern, Kings, Lake, Madera, Merced, Modoc, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Riverside, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Tulare, Tuolumne, Yolo
Minimal2462.68%Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Inyo, Lassen, Los Angeles, Marin, Mariposa, Mendocino, Mono, Monterey, Napa, Orange, San Benito, San Diego, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sierra, Trinity, Ventura

The BSE system and statewide mask mandate ended on June 15. The state of emergency stayed in effect, and there are still COVID-19 restrictions in effect for workplaces and live events with 5,000+ people. [113] [114]

On June 17, the state ended its mask mandate for vaccinated workers. [115]

July

August

On August 11, California became the first U.S. state to require that all teachers and school staff (regardless of whether the school is public or private) be fully vaccinated, or undergo weekly COVID-19 testing. [116]

On August 19, the state government announced that effective September 20, 2021, organizers of events with 1,000+ attendees would have to verify that all attendees are fully vaccinated or have tested negative for COVID-19. [117]

September

October

On October 1, the state government announced a vaccine mandate for all public school students aged 12+. [118]

November

December

On December 13, due to the threat of Omicron variant, it was announced that a state-level mask mandate for indoor public spaces would be reimplemented from December 15, 2021 through January 15, 2022, in all counties that did not already have a mask mandate, and regardless of vaccination status. The state order does not override existing mask mandates in counties that already had one prior to December 13, such as Los Angeles County and San Francisco (including provisions that differ from the new state mandate, such as San Francisco exempting "stable groups" of fully-vaccinated individuals from its mask mandate). [119] [120] [121]

Local government

Los Angeles metropolitan area

On February 26, 2020, Orange County declared a local health emergency to raise awareness and accelerate emergency planning. [122]

On March 8, 2020, Riverside County declared a public health emergency with a case being treated at Eisenhower Health in Rancho Mirage. [123]

On April 7, 2020, Mayor of Los Angeles Eric Garcetti announced that in accordance with recent CDC recommendations, it would institute a Worker Protection Order beginning April 10, requiring all employees and customers of stores and essential businesses to wear a face mask. Businesses will have the right to refuse service to customers who do not wear a face mask. [124] [125]

On July 15, 2021, due to newfound concerns over the Delta variant and a recent spike in cases, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health announced a regional mask mandate will be reinstated effective 11:59 p.m. on July 17. This applies in all indoor public spaces, regardless of vaccination status. [126]

On October 6, 2021, the Los Angeles City Council passed the SafePassLA ordinance, requiring proof of full vaccination for patrons of nearly all public indoor spaces, including malls, indoor restaurants and bars, museums, entertainment and recreation facilities, salons, and gyms. It also applies to all outdoor events with more than 5,000 attendees. [127] [128] The ordinance takes effect November 8, and supersedes the separate order issued by Los Angeles County where applicable. [129] [128]

Sacramento metropolitan area

On March 3, 2020, Placer County declared a public health emergency, following the confirmation of a second coronavirus case in that county. [130]

On March 7, 2020, a family in Elk Grove contracted the virus and was quarantined [131] which led to the school district of Elk Grove decision to close down all schools until March 13. [132]

On March 10, 2020, a resident of a retirement home tested positive in Elk Grove in Sacramento County. County health officials said that they had the capacity to only test 20 people per day and would be focusing all their efforts on the other residents of the retirement home. That resident died from complications of the virus on the same day.[ citation needed ]

On March 17, 2020, Sacramento County issued a stay-at-home directive, which, unlike a shelter in place order, is not a legal requirement. [133]

On March 19, 2020, Sacramento County upgraded its stay-at-home directive into an official order that carries legal consequences. [134]

On October 12, 2021, the Sacramento City Unified School District approved a vaccine mandate for all staff and students age 12+, effective November 30. [135]

San Diego metropolitan area

On February 14, 2020, San Diego County declared a local health emergency to ensure that the county had the resources needed to respond to the infections. The state of emergency lasted for seven days. [136]

On March 10, a woman became the first presumptive case of the novel coronavirus in San Diego County, who was being treated at Scripps Green Hospital, with verification of the test results pending from the CDC. The infection was related to overseas travel; she had not been subjected to a 14-day quarantine upon return, indicating that she did not come from one of the "high risk" countries at the time of her return. [137]

As of July 7,2020, contact tracers in San Diego had only contacted around 9,000 contacts out of an estimated 170,000 persons who need to be contacted. Some people reportedly become angry when contacted and demand to know who had tested positive. When contact tracers don't reveal this information, sometimes people hang up. They attempt to call them two more times, then mail a letter telling them how to stay safe. They call one more time after a 14-day period to see if the person developed symptoms. San Diego does not have a digital contact tracing app and has delayed plans to develop one, citing that the app would first have to go through multiple reviews for privacy and security. [138]

San Francisco Bay Area

Other

On March 24, 2020, Mendocino County revised its shelter-in-place order to align with the state order including a stricter list of essential businesses, closure of all parks within Mendocino County, and for the order to be in place until rescinded. [139]

See also

Notes

  1. Monday, August 31 was the effective date for the BSE guidelines. The guidelines started updating on Tuesday, September 8, and updated regularly on Tuesday until November 16.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Population as of July 2019.
  3. This reassignment was due to data correction from earlier data. Modoc County was also investigated, but its restrictions were not changed.
  4. This reassignment was delayed by one day due to Election Day.
  5. Placer and Trinity Counties' reassignments were not reported in the CDPH's official blueprint data chart.
  6. Starting with this reassignment, reassignments can happen on any day of the week.
  7. Both of these reassignments were missing from the CDPH's official blueprint data chart.
  8. This reassignment was unofficially announced on March 12.
  9. Merced County was not initially reassigned, but was adjudicated by the CDPH on April 14.
  10. Percentages may not add up to 100% due to rounding.

Related Research Articles

Gavin Newsom 40th governor of California

Gavin Christopher Newsom is an American politician and businessman serving as the 40th governor of California since January 2019. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 49th lieutenant governor of California from 2011 to 2019 and as the 42nd mayor of San Francisco from 2004 to 2011.

COVID-19 pandemic in California Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in California, United States

Ten of the first twenty confirmed COVID-19 cases in the United States occurred in California, the first of which was confirmed on January 26, 2020. All of the early confirmed cases were persons who had recently travelled to China, as testing was restricted to this group. On January 29, 2020, as disease containment protocols were still being developed, the U.S. Department of State evacuated 195 persons from Wuhan, China aboard a chartered flight to March Air Reserve Base in Riverside County, and in the process may have contributed to spread within the state and the US at large. On February 5, 2020, the U.S. evacuated 345 more citizens from Hubei Province to two military bases in California, Travis Air Force Base in Solano County and Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, San Diego, where they were quarantined for 14 days. A state of emergency was declared in the state on March 4, 2020 and as of February 24, 2021 remains in effect. A mandatory statewide stay-at-home order was issued on March 19, 2020 that was ended on January 25, 2021. On April 6, 2021, the state announced plans to fully reopen the economy by June 15, 2021.

COVID-19 pandemic in Maryland Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Maryland, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Maryland in March 2020. The first three cases of the virus were reported in Montgomery County on March 5, 2020. As of December 4, 2021, the Maryland Department of Health (MDH) reported 592,479 positive cases, 11,022 confirmed deaths, 11,585 patients released from isolation, 4,304,197 have been administered first COVID-19 vaccine doses, 3,797,484 have been administered second doses, and 321,146 have been administered a single dose vaccine.

COVID-19 pandemic in Florida COVID-19 pandemic in Florida, United States

On March 1, 2020, the U.S. state of Florida officially reported its first two COVID-19 cases, in Manatee and Hillsborough counties. In response, Governor Ron DeSantis then declared a public health emergency. There is evidence, however, that community spread of COVID-19 began in Florida much earlier, perhaps as early as the first week of January, with as many as 171 people in Florida who had shown symptoms now identified with COVID-19, prior to receiving confirmation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By March 11, the CDC saw evidence to conclude that community spread of the virus had occurred within the state. On April 1, 2020, Governor DeSantis issued an executive order to restrict activities within the state to those deemed as essential services.

COVID-19 pandemic in Texas Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Texas, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic in Texas is an ongoing viral pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The state of Texas confirmed its first case on February 13, 2020, among U.S. nationals evacuated from China to Joint Base San Antonio–Lackland beginning in early February; however, retrospective analyses have suggested a much earlier origin than previously thought. The first documented case of COVID-19 in Texas outside of evacuees at Lackland was confirmed on March 4 in Fort Bend County, and many of the state's largest cities recorded their first cases throughout March. The state recorded its first death associated with the disease on March 17 in Matagorda County.

COVID-19 pandemic in Arizona Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Arizona, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Arizona in January 2020. As of June 3, 2021 Arizona public health authorities reported 322 new cases of COVID-19 and five deaths, bringing the cumulative totals since the start of the pandemic to 882,691 cases and 17,653 deaths. 12.3% of the state's population has been positively diagnosed with COVID-19 since the first case was reported on January 26, 2020.

COVID-19 pandemic in New Mexico Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in New Mexico, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of New Mexico on March 11, 2020. On December 23, 2020, the New Mexico Department of Health reported 1,174 new COVID-19 cases and 40 deaths, bringing the cumulative statewide totals to 133,242 cases and 2,243 deaths since the start of the pandemic. During the last quarter of 2020, COVID-19 hospitalizations in New Mexico increased, reaching a peak of 947 hospitalizations on December 3.

COVID-19 pandemic in North Carolina Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in North Carolina, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of North Carolina on March 3, 2020.

COVID-19 pandemic in Pennsylvania Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Pennsylvania, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Pennsylvania in March 2020. As of October 7, 2021, the Pennsylvania Department of Health has confirmed 1,464,264 cumulative cases and 29,814 deaths in the state. As of September 1, 2021, Pennsylvania has administered 6,238,812 partial vaccinations, and 5,983,128 full vaccinations.

COVID-19 pandemic in South Carolina Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in South Carolina, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of South Carolina in March 2020. On April 2, 2020, DHEC announced that the virus had spread to all 46 counties in the state. During the month of June the seven-day moving average of new COVID-19 cases in South Carolina increased nearly five-fold, from 293 on June 1 to 1,398 on June 30, and continued to increase during July and into August. As of October 26, 2021 the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed 717,016 cases in the state and 11,737 deaths.

COVID-19 pandemic in Tennessee Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Tennessee, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Tennessee on March 5, 2020. As of March 1, 2021, there are 775,693 confirmed cases, 11,421 deaths, 750,755 recoveries, and 6,789,970 reported tests.

COVID-19 pandemic in Utah Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Utah, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic began in the U.S. state of Utah in early March 2020 with travel-related cases. Residents stockpiled goods, large conferences were made remote-only, postponed, or cancelled; a state of emergency was declared, and some public universities and other colleges switched to online-only classes. After the first case of community spread was found on March 14, Utah faced a shortage of testing kits, and public schools were ordered to be closed. Community spread was confirmed in more counties, and the state issued a public health order prohibiting dine-in service in restaurants and gatherings of more than 10 people except in grocery stores. A 5.7-magnitude earthquake struck the Wasatch Front on March 18, hampering the pandemic response.

U.S. state and local government responses to the COVID-19 pandemic Actions by sub-national U.S. political divisions on COVID-19 pandemic

State, territorial, tribal, and local governments have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States with various declarations of emergency, closure of schools and public meeting places, lockdowns, and other restrictions intended to slow the progression of the virus.

The following is a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States during 2020.

COVID-19 anti-lockdown protests in the United States Rallies against restrictions due to COVID-19 pandemic

Beginning in mid-April 2020, there were protests in several U.S. states against government-imposed lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. The protests, mostly organized by conservative groups and individuals, decried the economic and social impact of stay-at-home orders, business closures, and restricted personal movement and association, and demanded that their respective states be "re-opened" for normal business and personal activity.

COVID-19 pandemic in the San Francisco Bay Area Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in the San Francisco Bay Area

The San Francisco Bay Area, which includes the major cities of San Jose, San Francisco, and Oakland, was an early center of the COVID-19 pandemic in California. The first case of COVID-19 in the area was confirmed in Santa Clara County on January 31, 2020. A Santa Clara County resident was the earliest known death caused by COVID-19 in the United States, on February 6, suggesting that community spread of COVID-19 had been occurring long before any actual documented case. This article covers the 13 members of ABAHO, which includes the nine-county Bay Area plus the counties of Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Cruz.

The following is a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in California.

The following is a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in Texas.

Texas government response to the COVID-19 pandemic Actions by the Texas state government regarding the COVID-19 pandemic

The government of Texas's initial response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the state consisted of a decentralized system that was mostly reliant on local policies. As the pandemic progressed in Texas and throughout the rest of the country, the Texas government closed down several businesses and parks, and it eventually imposed a statewide stay-at-home order in late May. Then, between May and June 2020, the state government initiated a phased reopening, which was viewed as controversial. The reopening was phased back in June and July 2020 following a new surge of COVID-19 cases in the state. In March 2021, as COVID-19 vaccines began to be administered throughout the U.S., the Texas government reopened the state again.

References

  1. Holshue, Michelle L.; DeBolt, Chas; Lindquist, Scott; Lofy, Kathy H.; Wiesman, John; Bruce, Hollianne; Spitters, Christopher; Ericson, Keith; Wilkerson, Sara; Tural, Ahmet; Diaz, George; Cohn, Amanda; Fox, LeAnne; Patel, Anita; Gerber, Susan I.; Kim, Lindsay; Tong, Suxiang; Lu, Xiaoyan; Lindstrom, Steve; Pallansch, Mark A.; Weldon, William C.; Biggs, Holly M.; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Pillai, Satish K. (March 5, 2020). "First Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the United States". New England Journal of Medicine. 382 (10): 929–936. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2001191. PMC   7092802 . PMID   32004427.
  2. "Outbreak of Pneumonia of Unknown Etiology (PUE) in Wuhan, China" Archived May 18, 2020, at the Wayback Machine , CDC, January 8, 2020
  3. Beaumont, Peter; Borger, Julian (April 9, 2020). "WHO warned of transmission risk in January, despite Trump claims". The Guardian . Archived from the original on July 3, 2020. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  4. Kuo, Lily (January 21, 2020). "China confirms human-to-human transmission of coronavirus". The Guardian . Archived from the original on July 14, 2020. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  5. Wheeler, Ian (February 4, 2020). "Orange County coronavirus patient released, in good condition, health officials say". Orange County Register. Archived from the original on February 5, 2020. Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  6. Lovelace, Berkeley, Jr.; Feuer, William (January 31, 2020). "CDC officials confirm 7th US case of coronavirus, in California man who traveled to China". CNBC. Archived from the original on February 1, 2020. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  7. Woolfolk, John (February 20, 2020). "Santa Clara County declares its first coronavirus case fully recovered". The Mercury News. Archived from the original on February 21, 2020. Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  8. Erin Allday; Matt Kawahara (April 22, 2020). "First known U.S. coronavirus death occurred on Feb. 6 in Santa Clara County". San Francisco Chronicle . Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  9. "Autopsy Reports Date First COVID-19 Bay Area Deaths to February". NBC Bay Area. April 21, 2020. Retrieved April 22, 2020.
  10. Sullivan, Peter (February 27, 2020). "California monitoring 8,400 people for coronavirus". The Hill . Archived from the original on February 28, 2020. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  11. Thompson, Don; Beam, Adam. "New coronavirus case escalates US response". Associated Press . Archived from the original on February 28, 2020. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  12. "Gov. Newsom declares state of emergency due to coronavirus". KCRA . March 4, 2020. Archived from the original on March 5, 2020. Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  13. "Governor Newsom Declares State of Emergency to Help State Prepare for Broader Spread of COVID-19" (Press release). California Office of the Governor. March 4, 2020. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  14. Budryk, Zack (March 4, 2020). "California governor declares state of emergency over coronavirus". The Hill, Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on March 5, 2020. Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  15. "California bans mass gatherings to slow spread of coronavirus". Reuters. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  16. "Newsom issues order allowing California to take over hotels for coronavirus patients". Los Angeles Times. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  17. "California Advises Against Even Small Social Gatherings". KPBS Public Media. Associated Press. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  18. "California Governor: No Large Gatherings Due to Coronavirus". US News. Associated Press. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  19. Hagan, Chris; Miller, Nick (March 12, 2020). "Gatherings Of More Than 250 People Should Be Postponed Or Canceled Due To Coronavirus, California Governor Says". CapRadio. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  20. "Coronavirus live updates: SF bans evictions due to financial distress, Contra Costa closes courthouses". March 13, 2020. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  21. "Coronavirus School Closures". March 13, 2020. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  22. "SLO County K-12 schools closing due to coronavirus concerns". KSBY. March 13, 2020. Archived from the original on April 4, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  23. "Coronavirus Guidance March 13, 2020 – Public Health Department – County of Santa Clara". www.sccgov.org. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  24. "Los Alamitos Unified School District to close schools for two weeks starting March 16". March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on April 4, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  25. "How the Bay Area got a jumpstart on coronavirus – and the country missed a chance". SFChronicle.com. April 3, 2020. Archived from the original on April 4, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2020.
  26. "Gov. Newsom asks California bars to close, tells older residents to isolate due to coronavirus". Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  27. Lin II, Rong-Gong (March 16, 2020). "How the San Francisco Bay Area coronavirus 'shelter in place' order works". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  28. "Seven Bay Area Jurisdictions Order Residents to Stay Home – Public Health Department – County of Santa Clara". www.sccgov.org. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  29. "Order of the Health Officer of the County of Santa Clara – Public Health Department – County of Santa Clara". www.sccgov.org. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  30. Allday, Eric (March 16, 2020). "Bay Area authorities place strictest order in country: 'Shelter in place,' only essential businesses open in 6 counties". SFChronicle.com. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  31. "Coronavirus". www.santacruzhealth.com.
  32. Romero, Sheyanne N.; Ostly, Ayrton. "UPDATE: Two confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Monterey County". The Salinas Californian. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  33. "SAN BENITO COUNTY HEALTH OFFICER ISSUES ORDER REQUIRING RESIDENTS TO STAY AT HOME EXCEPT FOR ESSENTIAL NEEDS" (PDF). hhsa.cosb.us. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  34. "Health Officer Orders County Residents Shelter in Place". sonomacounty.ca.gov. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  35. Bollag, Sophia (March 21, 2020). "Coronavirus surge will strain California hospitals, Gov. Gavin Newsom warns". The Sacramento Bee. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020. Also on Tuesday, federal Defense Secretary Mark Esper said the military will provide 2,000 ventilators and up to 5 million respirator masks from its strategic reserve.
  36. "ORDER OF THE YOLO COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICER DIRECTING INDIVIDUALS TO SHELTER IN PLACE OF RESIDENCE AND RESTRICTING NON-ESSENTIAL ACTIVITIES IN RESPONSE TO COVID-19 OUTBREAK, WITH EXCEPTIONS AND EXEMPTIONS, AS SPECIFIED". www.yolocounty.org. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  37. "City of Fresno | City Announces Important Update on Coronavirus State of Emergency". www.fresno.gov. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  38. "ORDER OF THE NAPA COUNTY HEALTH OFFICER DIRECTING ALL INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE COUNTY TO SHELTER AT HOME". www.countyofnapa.org. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  39. "San Luis Obispo County health officials issue shelter-at-home, seven coronavirus cases confirmed". KSBY. March 18, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  40. Doohan, Noemi (March 18, 2020). "3.18.20 Health Order to Shelter-in-Place". Mendocino County. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020.
  41. "Hospital Ships, Other DOD Assets Prepare for Coronavirus Response". U.S. Department of Defense. March 18, 2020. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  42. Wikisource-logo.svg   California Executive Order N-33-20  via Wikisource. [ scan   Wikisource-logo.svg ]
  43. "California Gov. Gavin Newsom announces statewide coronavirus 'stay at home' order | Fox News". www.foxnews.com. Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  44. "California governor issues statewide order for people to stay at home amid virus outbreak". San Diego Union-Tribune. March 20, 2020. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  45. Willon, Phil (March 19, 2020). "Battling coronavirus, California asks Navy for hospital ship and two mobile hospitals" . Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  46. "Gov. Newsom deploys California National Guard to assist food banks during coronavirus outbreak". Los Angeles Times . March 20, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2021.
  47. Gartrell, Nate (March 21, 2020). "SC Convention Center to be converted into medical station". San Jose Mercury News. San Jose, California. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  48. "Remarks by President Trump, Vice President Pence, and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force in Press Briefing". whitehouse.gov . Archived from the original on January 20, 2021. Retrieved March 24, 2020 via National Archives.
  49. Initiative, Prison Policy. "Criminal justice responses to the coronavirus pandemic". www.prisonpolicy.org. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  50. Siguenza, Edward (March 24, 2020). "Historic COVID-19 mission for California State Guard". Defense Visual Information Distribution Service . Retrieved April 27, 2021.
  51. "State Superintendent Tony Thurmond Issues Statement on 2019-20 School Year Amid Current School Safety Concerns". www.cde.ca.gov. Archived from the original on April 4, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  52. UC Office of the President (April 1, 2020). "UC admissions requirements to help students, families in wake of COVID-19". University of California. Archived from the original on April 2, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  53. "Contract for 200M masks". April 7, 2020. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  54. Willon, Phil. "Newsom assures Californians that the state has enough ventilators in coronavirus fight". Los Angeles Times . Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  55. "California, Oregon & Washington Announce Western States Pact". California Governor. April 13, 2020. Archived from the original on April 13, 2020. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  56. "Governor Newsom Announces New Initiatives to Support California Workers Impacted by COVID-19". California Governor. April 15, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  57. "Every lawsuit vs. California's shelter-in-place order, explained". CalMatters. May 11, 2020. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  58. Moreno, J. Edward (April 22, 2020). "California governor orders autopsies back to December to find out how long coronavirus has been in the state". TheHill. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  59. KABC (April 24, 2020). "Coronavirus: Newsom announces program for local eateries to prepare, deliver meals to seniors amid COVID-19 pandemic". ABC7 Los Angeles. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  60. "Governor Newsom Announces Expansions and New Initiatives to Combat Food Insecurity". California Governor. April 29, 2020. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  61. 1 2 Hubler, Shawn; Fuller, Thomas (June 29, 2020). "'Our Luck May Have Run Out': California's Case Count Explodes". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  62. Rucker, Philip; Dawsey, Josh; Abutaleb, Yasmeen; Costa, Robert; Sun, Lena H. (May 2, 2020). "34 days of pandemic: Inside Trump's desperate attempts to reopen America". The Washington Post . Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  63. "Governor Newsom Announces Workers' Compensation Benefits". California Governor. May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 10, 2020.
  64. "Governor Newsom Releases Updated Industry Guidance". California Governor. May 7, 2020. Retrieved May 10, 2020.
  65. "Governor Newsom Mail-In Ballots". California Governor. May 8, 2020. Retrieved May 10, 2020.
  66. "California Department of Public Health Announces New Regional Variance Opportunity". California Department of Public Health. May 18, 2020. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  67. "CDPH Announces Most Counties Can Reopen Barbershops and Hair Salons with Modifications". California Department of Public Health. May 26, 2020. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  68. "California Public Health Officials Provide COVID-19 Update". California Department of Public Health. June 5, 2020. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  69. "Resilience Roadmap". COVID19.CA.gov. State of California. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 13, 2020.
  70. "California Public Health Officials Provide COVID-19 Update". California Department of Public Health. June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  71. Marinucci, Carla; Colliver, Victoria. "California requires masks statewide in bid to slow coronavirus spread". Politico PRO. Retrieved June 18, 2020.
  72. Higgins-Dunn, Noah (June 18, 2020). "California Gov. Gavin Newsom orders residents to wear face coverings in most public spaces". CNBC. Retrieved June 18, 2020.
  73. "Gov. Newsom to Imperial County: 'I'm Committed to Intervening'". NBC 7 San Diego. Retrieved June 27, 2020.
  74. Myers, John; Wigglesworth, Alex; Newberry, Laura; Holland, Gale (June 28, 2020). "Newsom orders bars closed in 7 California counties including L.A. due to coronavirus spread". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved June 29, 2020.
  75. Luna, Taryn; Willon, Phil (July 1, 2020). "Restaurant dining rooms, wineries, card rooms to close for at least three weeks in 19 California counties". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  76. Higgins-Dunn, Noah (July 13, 2020). "California closes indoor restaurants, movie theaters and all bars statewide as coronavirus cases rise". CNBC.
  77. Cowan, Jill (July 14, 2020). "Newsom Rolls Back Reopening in California". The New York Times.
  78. Singh, Maanvi (June 26, 2020). "Why are California's Covid-19 cases surging? Here's what we know". The Guardian.
  79. Graff, Amy (August 18, 2020). "San Diego County removed from California coronavirus watch list". SFGATE. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  80. Shalby, Colleen (August 24, 2020). "More counties removed from California's COVID-19 watchlist". Los Angeles Times.
  81. 1 2 3 Higgins-Dunn, Noah (August 28, 2020). "California's Newsom deploys new coronavirus reopening framework, most counties under strict orders". CNBC. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  82. 1 2 3 "Governor Newsom Unveils Blueprint for a Safer Economy, a Statewide, Stringent and Slow Plan for Living with COVID-19". California Governor. August 28, 2020. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  83. "California Announces New COVID-19 Reopening Plan". www.capradio.org. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  84. "Here's how California's new coronavirus reopening rules will affect you". Los Angeles Times. August 28, 2020. Retrieved August 28, 2020.
  85. Tapp, Tom (August 28, 2020). "California Coronavirus Update: Governor Gavin Newsom Reveals Stricter, "Slower" COVID-19 Reopening Guidelines For Businesses And Schools". Deadline. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  86. Tapp, Tom (September 1, 2020). "California Coronavirus Update: Governor Gavin Newsom's Little-Noticed Reopening Requirement Could Trip L.A. Up". Deadline. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  87. "California Healthy Places Index" . Retrieved December 31, 2020.
  88. "What California's new equity rule means for economic reopening". Politico. October 8, 2020. Retrieved December 31, 2020.
  89. "Infection Rates in Neighborhoods With Low Voter Turnout, Many Bars, Few Trees Could Slow California's Reopening Under New 'Equity Metric'". Reason.com. October 9, 2020. Retrieved December 31, 2020.
  90. Willon, Phil (November 2, 2020). "Gov. Newsom rebuked by Sutter County court for use of executive power amid COVID-19 pandemic". Los Angeles Times.
  91. Tapp, Tom (November 19, 2020). "California Governor Gavin Newsom Issues Limited Stay-At-Home Order Through December 21; "We Are Sounding The Alarm"". Deadline. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  92. Kolodny, Lora (November 20, 2020). "California gives Tesla 'essential workforce' exemption from new Covid-19 health orders". CNBC. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  93. Myers, John; Lin, Rong-Gong, II (December 3, 2020). "Newsom orders new limits on California businesses and activities as COVID-19 soars". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on December 4, 2020. Retrieved December 3, 2020.
  94. "California governor to impose regional stay-at-home orders". CBS News. December 3, 2020. Retrieved December 3, 2020 via YouTube.
  95. Graff, Amy (December 9, 2020). "COVID-19 updates: More California residents required to follow new order". SFGate. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  96. "Recall campaign against once-popular Gov. Newsom gains momentum". ABC 7 News. January 2, 2021. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  97. Koseff, Alexei; Williams, Michael (January 24, 2021). "Gov. Newsom will end stay-at-home orders across California". The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved January 25, 2021.
  98. Luna, Taryn (January 24, 2021). "Newsom cancels California's COVID-19 stay-at-home orders". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 25, 2021.
  99. "Supreme Court rebukes California's strict coronavirus rules for churches". Catholic News Agency. Retrieved February 6, 2021.
  100. "Governor Newsom Signs Legislative Package Providing Urgent Relief to Californians Experiencing Pandemic Hardship".
  101. Jones, Dustin (March 1, 2021). "California Offers $2 Billion Incentive In A Push For In-Person Learning".
  102. Money, Luke; Lin, Rong-Gong, II; MartÍn, Hugo (March 5, 2021). "California theme parks, stadiums can reopen as soon as April 1 under revamped COVID-19 rules".
  103. Money, Luke; Cosgrove, Jaclyn (March 11, 2021). "California breweries, wineries and distilleries can reopen as COVID-19 restrictions lifted". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  104. 1 2 Tapp, Tom (April 6, 2021). "California Ending Most Covid Restrictions: "We'll Be Opening Up On June 15," Announces Newsom". Deadline. Retrieved April 12, 2021.
  105. 1 2 Money, Luke; Luna, Taryn. "California aims to fully reopen its economy June 15". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 6, 2021.
  106. "Beyond the Blueprint for a Safer Economy". www.cdph.ca.gov. Retrieved May 3, 2021.
  107. "California sending oxygen equipment to help India's COVID crisis" . Retrieved May 3, 2021.
  108. "Governor Newsom Signs Bill Giving Small Business a $6.2 Billion Tax Cut" . Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  109. "California Roars Back: Governor Newsom Announces Largest State Tax Rebate in American History" . Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  110. "Newsom says mask mandate will end after June 15". KRON4. May 12, 2021. Retrieved May 12, 2021.
  111. Nuttle, Matthew. "Free Money: California launches 'Vax for the Win' incentive program to get more people vaccinated" . Retrieved June 8, 2021.
  112. State of California. "Blueprint for a Safer Economy". covid19.ca.gov. Retrieved January 27, 2021. California has a blueprint for reducing COVID-19 in the state with revised criteria for loosening and tightening restrictions on activities...Every county in California is assigned to a tier based on its test positivity and adjusted case rate.
  113. Allday, Erin; Ho, Catherine (May 17, 2021). "California to lift indoor mask mandate June 15 for vaccinated people". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved May 17, 2021.
  114. "Beyond the Blueprint for Industry and Business Sectors". California Department of Public Health. May 21, 2021. Retrieved June 15, 2021.
  115. DiFeliciantonio, Chase (June 17, 2021). "Vaccinated workers can now do away with masks on the job in California". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved June 18, 2021.
  116. Lah, Kyung; Mossburg, Cheri; Sanchez, Ray (August 11, 2021). "California to mandate vaccines or regular testing for teachers". CNN. Retrieved August 11, 2021.
  117. Money, Luke; Lin, Rong-Gong, II (August 19, 2021). "California tightens COVID-19 rules for large indoor events". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 19, 2021.
  118. Rodriguez, Olga R.; Beam, Adam. "California to Require All Schoolchildren to Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19". NBC Bay Area.
  119. "State reinstates indoor mask mandate for one month amid new COVID-19 increase". ABC7. December 13, 2021. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  120. Tapp, Tom (December 16, 2021). "Half Of California's Counties May Be Exempt From Parts Of Its Universal Indoor Mask Mandate". Deadline. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  121. "These three Bay Area counties get exemptions from California's COVID mask rules". The Mercury News. December 15, 2021. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  122. Ortiz, John Bacon and Jorge L. "San Francisco, Orange County declare coronavirus health emergencies". USA TODAY. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  123. "Coronavirus: Public health emergency declared for Riverside County". The Press Enterprise . March 8, 2020. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020.
  124. "What you need to know about L.A.'s mandatory coronavirus mask, face covering rules". Los Angeles Times. April 8, 2020. Archived from the original on April 8, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  125. "Garcetti: Non-Medical Essential Workers, Customers Required To Wear Face Coverings". April 7, 2020. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  126. "L.A. County will require masks indoors amid alarming rise in coronavirus cases". Los Angeles Times. July 15, 2021. Retrieved July 15, 2021.
  127. "L.A. to require proof of COVID vaccination at indoor restaurants, salons, other venues". Los Angeles Times. October 6, 2021. Retrieved November 6, 2021.
  128. 1 2 "LISTING OF DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH PRESS RELEASES". publichealth.lacounty.gov. Retrieved November 6, 2021.
  129. Tapp, Tom (November 6, 2021). "Strict Los Angeles Indoor Vaccine Mandate Goes Into Effect Monday As Covid Cases Continue To Rise". Deadline. Retrieved November 6, 2021.
  130. Yoon-Hendricks, Alexandra (March 3, 2020). "Placer County reports 2nd coronavirus case. 'Critically ill' patient was on cruise ship". The Sacramento Bee . Archived from the original on April 9, 2020. Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  131. "Elk Grove Schools Close After Coronavirus Case Confirmed In City. Sacramento City Schools To Remain Open". capradio.org. Retrieved March 8, 2020.
  132. "Media Statement: Elk Grove Unified Closes School, Cancels Classes and Cancels Student-Related Activities Effective March 7 to March 13, 2020. | NEWSROOM". blogs.egusd.net. March 7, 2020. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020. Retrieved March 8, 2020.
  133. "Stay at home orders". Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  134. "Sacramento County issues formal order for residents to stay at home as coronavirus spreads". Sacramento Bee. March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  135. "Sacramento City Unified School District Votes To Make COVID-19 Vaccine Mandatory For All Students, Staff". CBS Sacramento. October 13, 2021. Retrieved October 13, 2021.
  136. "County declares local state of emergency in response to the coronavirus in San Diego –". McKinnon Broadcasting. February 15, 2020. Archived from the original on February 15, 2020. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  137. "San Diego County Confirms First Presumptive Coronavirus Case". KPBS Public Media. March 10, 2020. Archived from the original on March 11, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  138. Trageser, Claire (July 7, 2020). "San Diego's Contact Tracing Program Not Keeping Up With Virus Surge". KPBS.
  139. "COVID-19 News | Mendocino County, CA". www.mendocinocounty.org. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.