Social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Russia

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Attribution: text was copied from 2020_coronavirus_pandemic_in_Russia on February 1, 2021. Please see the history of that page for full attribution.

Contents

This article is about the social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Russia.

Event cancellations

On 5 March, First Deputy Prime Minister Andrey Belousov announced the cancellation of the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum which was due to be held from 3 to 6 June 2020. [1]

On 11 March, Russian Defence Minister Sergey Shoygu cancelled the Moscow International Security Conference which had been scheduled for 22 to 23 April. [1]

On 17 March, TASS reported that all football, hockey and basketball games were suspended until 10 April. [2] This was later extended to 31 May. [3] On the same day, UEFA confirmed postponing Euro 2020 until summer 2021, one of the venues of which is Krestovsky Stadium in Saint Petersburg. [4]

Despite the fact that a conscription started on 1 April, conscripts won't be sent to duty stations until 20 May. [5]

On 16 April, President Putin postponed the 2020 Victory Day Parade. [6] On 26 May, President Putin announced that the 2020 Victory Day Parade would be held on 24 June, coinciding with the Moscow Victory Parade of 1945. [7]

On 20 July, organisers for the "Immortal Regiment" march postponed the event to 9 May 2021. [8]

Religious services and organisations

On 17 March, the leadership of the Russian Orthodox Church published Instructions to rectors of parishes and monasteries’ town churches, abbots and abbesses of the monasteries of the Russian Orthodox Church over the threat of spreading coronavirus infection (in English), which said it had been approved by the ROC's Holy Synod and instructed the ROC's clergy to use disposable cups, gloves, and facial tissue during sacraments and celebrations, disinfect church plates and premises regularly, and refrain from offering the hand for kissing. [9] A nearly identical Russian-language Instructions were addressed to the clergy of the Moscow diocese and said it had been approved by the Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus'. [10] When in St. Petersburg attendance of places of worship was restricted for the public on 26 March, the Moscow Patriarchate's lawyer deemed it unlawful. [11]

On 29 March, the ROC's Patriarch Kirill delivered a sermon in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour that urged people to refrain from visiting church, citing the life of St. Mary of Egypt. [12] On 3 April, Kirill issued an encyclical for the clergy and faithful of the "dioceses in the territory of the Russian Federation" urging the clergy to conduct church services without laypeople's presence. [13] As the city of Moscow decided to tighten lockdown measures starting from 13 April, and following a request from chief sanitary doctor of Moscow, the Patriarch's Vicar instructed that church services in the city diocese be held without public (laypeople). [14] A similar decision was taken in St. Petersburg. [15] As of 16 April 2020, according to RBK, 42 out of 85 federal subjects including Moscow, Moscow Oblast and Saint Petersburg, issued instructions to close places of worship for general public, which would extend into the Easter period, which in the Orthodox Church was to begin on 19 April. [16] Equivocation and occasionally contradictory instructions issued by the Moscow Patriarchate's top officials undermined the authority of the Church's leadership while restrictive measures caused opposition on the part of conservative circles of the ROC's congregation. [17] [18] On Easter Sunday, the degree of admission restrictions, if any, to religious ceremonies varied significantly from region to region (federal subject), the ROC's branches outside the RF territory given free rein to find appropriate arrangement with local authorities. [19] While Patriarch Kirill presided over the Easter night service in Moscow's cathedral church with no laypeople in attendance, the ROC's most venerated St Trinity monastery in the Moscow region, which is under the Patriarch's direct spiritual authority, defied his directions by conducting Easter services as normal. This and similar incidents in other major monasteries led to massive spread of the COVID-19 infection in a number of the ROC's monasteries and seminaries in Russia as well as in Belarus and Ukraine. [18] [20] [21] [22] [23]

Various Muslim communities closed their mosques. In Moscow, the Cathedral Mosque, the Old Mosque, and the Memorial Mosque on Poklonnaya Hill closed on 18 March. [24] On 23 March, mosques in Crimea and Sevastopol were shut down. [25] On the next day, all the mosques in Krasnodar Krai and Adygea were closed as well. [26] Same measures were planned in Dagestan. [27]

On 18 March, Rabbi Berel Lazar closed the Bolshaya Bronnaya Synagogue, Maryina Roshcha Synagogue, and Zhukovka Jewish Centre. [28] Eleven members of the community were hospitalised, with four COVID-19 cases confirmed, the first one being a rabbi who felt sick after Purim celebration on 9 March. [29] [30] On 24 March, Rabbi Berel Lazar and the Federation of Jewish Communities recommended that all synagogues to close down and the community centres and Jewish schools switch to distance education. [31]

Related Research Articles

Russian Orthodox Church Autocephalous Eastern Orthodox church, headquartered in Moscow, Russia

The Russian Orthodox Church, alternatively legally known as the Moscow Patriarchate, is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Christian churches. The primate of the ROC is the Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus'. The ROC, as well as its primate, officially ranks fifth in the Orthodox order of precedence, immediately below the four ancient patriarchates of the Greek Orthodox Church: Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. As of 15 October 2018, the ROC suspended communion with the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, having unilaterally severed ties in reaction to the establishment of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine, which was finalised by the Ecumenical Patriarchate on 5 January 2019.

Patriarch Theodore II of Alexandria

Theodore (Theodoros) II (Greek: Πάπας και Πατριάρχης Αλεξανδρείας και πάσης Αφρικής Θεόδωρος Β΄; born Nikolaos Horeftakis, November 25, 1954) is the current Eastern Orthodox Patriarch of Alexandria and all Africa. He is formally styled His Divine Beatitude the Pope and Patriarch of the Great City of Alexandria, Libya, Pentapolis, Ethiopia, All Egypt and All Africa, Father of Fathers, Pastor of Pastors, Prelate of Prelates, the Thirteenth of the Apostles and Judge of the Universe. He is a monk in the Agarathos Holy Monastery of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary.

Filaret (Denysenko)

Patriarch Filaret is the primate and Patriarch of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church – Kyiv Patriarchate. He was the honorary Patriarch of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine (2018–2019), and the former Metropolitan of Kyiv of the Russian Orthodox Church (1966–1992). He was defrocked and in 1997 excommunicated by the ROC.

Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia

The Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia, also called Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia or ROCOR, or Russian Orthodox Church Abroad (ROCA), is a semi-autonomous part of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Ukrainian Orthodox Church (Moscow Patriarchate) Ukrainian church under jurisdiction of Russian Orthodox church

The Ukrainian Orthodox Church, commonly referred to as the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate is one of the "self-governing" churches under the jurisdiction of the Moscow Patriarchate, i.e. the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC). The ROC defines the UOC-MP as a "self-governing church with rights of wide autonomy".

Ugresha Monastery

Nikolo-Ugreshsky Monastery is a walled stauropegic Russian Orthodox monastery of St. Nicholas the Miracle-Worker located in a suburb of Moscow, Dzerzhinsky. It is the town's main landmark and is featured on the city emblem.

Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus Maximum leader of the Russian Orthodox Church

The Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus', also known as the Patriarch of Moscow and all Russia, is the official title of the Bishop of Moscow who is the primate of the Russian Orthodox Church. It is often preceded by the honorific "His Holiness". While as the diocesan bishop of the Moscow diocese he has direct canonical authority over Moscow only, the Patriarch has a number of church-wide administrative powers within and in accordance with the charter of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Joint Declaration of Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill

The Joint Declaration of Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill, also known as the Havana Declaration, was issued following the first meeting in February 2016 between Pope Francis, who as the Bishop of Rome is the pontiff of the Catholic Church, and Patriarch Kirill of Moscow, Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus', Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC), the largest of the Eastern Orthodox churches. This was the first time leaders of the Catholic Church and the Moscow Patriarchate had met. While the meeting was also seen as a symbolic moment in the history of relations between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox churches as a community, which had split in the Great Schism of 1054, centuries before the Moscow Patriarchate was constituted, it was not expected to lead to any immediate rapprochement between them.

2018 Moscow–Constantinople schism Ongoing split between the Eastern Orthodox patriarchates of Moscow and Constantinople

A schism between the Russian Orthodox Church and the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople began on 15 October 2018 when the former unilaterally severed full communion with the latter.

Diocese of the Philippines and Vietnam

The Diocese of the Philippines and Vietnam, is a diocese of the Patriarchate of Moscow created on 26 February 2019, directly under the Patriarchal Exarchate in Southeast Asia (PESEA).

Spanish-Portuguese diocese Diocese of the Moscow Patriarchate of Spain and Portugal.

The Spanish-Portuguese diocese (SPD) or Diocese of Madrid and Lisbon is a diocese of the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) created on 28 December 2018. The diocese is part of the Patriarchal Exarchate in Western Europe.

Eugene (Reshetnikov)

Metropolitan Eugene is a bishop of the Russian Orthodox Church, Metropolitan of Tallinn and All Estonia and primate of the Estonian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate, former rector of Moscow Theological Academy (1995-2018) and Chairman of the Educational Committee of the Holy Synod (1994-2018).

Russian Orthodox Diocese of Chersonesus

The Diocese of Chersonesus is a diocese of the Russian Orthodox Church which covers the territory of France, Switzerland, Liechtenstein and Monaco. This diocese is part of the Patriarchal Exarchate in Western Europe since 28 December 2018.

Mark (Golovkov) Russian Eastern Orthodox bishop

Metropolitan Mark, is a bishop in the Russian Orthodox Church. He holds the title of "Metropolitan of the Russian Orthodox Diocese of Ryazan and Mikhailovsky, head of the Ryazan Metropolis", as well as "Metropolitan of Budapest and Hungary".

Tikhon (Zaitsev) Russian Orthodox Archbishop of Berlin and Germany

Archbishop Tikhon (Zaitsev), is the archbishop of Podolsky and the primate of the diocese of Berlin and Germany of the Russian Orthodox Church; he holds the title of "Archbishop of Berlin and Germany".

COVID-19 pandemic in Russia Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Russia

The COVID-19 pandemic in Russia is part of the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have spread to Russia on 31 January 2020, when two Chinese citizens in Tyumen (Siberia) and Chita tested positive for the virus, with both cases being contained. Early prevention measures included restricting the border with China and extensive testing. The infection spread from Italy on 2 March, leading to additional measures such as cancelling events, closing schools, theatres, and museums, as well as shutting the border and declaring a non-working period which, after two extensions, lasted until 11 May 2020. By the end of March 2020, the vast majority of federal subjects, including Moscow, had imposed lockdowns. By 17 April 2020, cases had been confirmed in all federal subjects. At the beginning of September 2020, the number of COVID-19 cases in Russia reached a million. The number of COVID-19 cases in the country also reached two million on 19 November 2020, three million on 26 December 2020, four million on 10 February 2021 and five million on 23 May 2021. At the end of 2020, there were nearly 3.2 million COVID-19 cases in Russia. On 3 April 2021, the number of COVID-19 deaths in the country reached 100,000.

Russian government response to the COVID-19 pandemic Actions by the Russian central and local governments on COVID-19 pandemic

The government of Russia has initially responded to the COVID-19 pandemic in the country with preventive measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 in the country, which involved imposing quarantines, carrying raids on potential virus carriers, and using facial recognition to impose quarantine measures. Measures to prevent a crisis in Russia include banning the export of medical masks, random checks on the Moscow Metro, and cancellation of large-scale events by schools. The Russian government has also taken measures to prevent foreign citizens from heavily affected countries from visiting Russia. Local governments have also responded to the pandemic by imposing their own preventive measures in their communities.

Seraphim, born Fyodor Mikhailovich Glushakov was a Bishop of the Russian Orthodox Church, who headed the Diocese of Anadyr' and Chukotka from 2011 to 2015.

COVID-19 vaccination in Russia

The COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Russia is an ongoing mass immunization campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in response to the ongoing pandemic in the country. Mass vaccinations began in December 2020, starting with primarily doctors, medical workers and teachers, and in January 2021, this was extended to the entire population.

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