SARS-CoV-2 Zeta variant

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Zeta variant, also known as lineage P.2, [lower-alpha 1] is a variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. It was first detected in the state of Rio de Janeiro; it harbors the E484K mutation, but not the N501Y and K417T mutations. It evolved independently in Rio de Janeiro without being directly related to the Gamma variant from Manaus. [1] [2]

Contents

Under the simplified naming scheme proposed by the World Health Organization, P.2 was labeled "Zeta variant", and was considered a variant of interest (VOI), but not a variant of concern. [3] As of July 2021, Zeta is no longer considered a variant of interest by the WHO. [4]

Mutations

The Zeta genome has 3 amino acid mutations: E484K, D614G, and V1176F, all of which are found in the virus's spike protein code. [5] According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, F565L has been detected in some of the Zeta variant sequences, but not all. [6]

Notes

  1. A sub-lineage of B.1.1.28

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References

  1. "PANGO lineages Lineage P.2". COV lineages. Retrieved January 28, 2021. P.2… Alias of B.1.1.28.2, Brazilian lineage
  2. Voloch, Carolina M.; da Silva Francisco, Ronaldo; de Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Cardoso, Cynthia C.; Brustolini, Otavio J.; Gerber, Alexandra L.; Guimarães, Ana Paula de C.; Mariani, Diana; da Costa, Raissa Mirella; Ferreira, Orlando C.; Cavalcanti, Adriana Cony (April 26, 2021). "Genomic Characterization of a Novel SARS-CoV-2 Lineage from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil". Journal of Virology. 95 (10). doi:10.1128/JVI.00119-21. ISSN   0022-538X. PMC   8139668 . PMID   33649194.
  3. "Genomic characterisation of an emergent SARS-CoV-2 lineage in Manaus: preliminary findings". Virological. January 12, 2021. Retrieved June 26, 2021.
  4. "Tracking SARS-CoV-2 variants". who.int. World Health Organization.
  5. 1 2 "Spike Variants: Zeta variant, aka P.2". covdb.stanford.edu. Stanford University Coronavirus Antiviral & Resistance Database. July 1, 2021. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  6. "SARS-CoV-2 Variant Classifications and Definitions". CDC.gov. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved July 5, 2021.