COVID-19 pandemic in Tasmania

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in Tasmania
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location Tasmania, Australia
First outbreak Wuhan, Hubei, China
Confirmed cases235[ needs update ]
Active cases5,094
Hospitalised cases28
Critical cases3
Recovered21,298
Deaths
17 (as of 25 Jan. 2022)
Fatality rate0.09%
Government website
coronavirus.tas.gov.au

The COVID-19 pandemic in Tasmania is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 ( COVID-19 ) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Contents

Timeline

2020

Scotch Oakburn College in Tasmania closed as a preemptive decision in fear of rising SARS-CoV-2 cases. It was to be closed from 16 March until at least 30 March. [1]

On 17 March, Tasmania declared a public health emergency. [2]

On 19 March, all "non-essential" travellers to Tasmania, including returning residents, were subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine. [3]

Burnie outbreak

On 12 April 2020, in response to an outbreak in Burnie, business restrictions were put in place for 14 days. It included the closure of most retail businesses except for those providing essential services, or those who can provide online services and home delivery. The North West Regional Hospital (NWRH) and North West Private Hospital (NWPH) were temporarily closed from Monday 13 April 2020, and staff, patients, and visitors since 27 March, were required to self-quarantine for 14 days. [4] The self-quarantine affected up to 5,000 people. Additional testing was announced, and emergency medical teams from the Australian Defence Force were sent to Burnie to cover for hospital staff. [5]

On 1 August, the 2020 Tasmanian Legislative Council periodic election, deferred from 30 May to prevent the spread of COVID-19, took place. [6]

2021

Due to a growing cluster in Bondi, Sydney, from 4 pm on 23 June Tasmania declared the City of Sydney, Bayside, Canada Bay, Inner West, Randwick, Waverley and Woollahra as high-risk. Border entry will not be allowed to anyone who was in those areas, on or since, 11 June without approval from the Deputy State Controller. [7] [8]

On 22 July, the death of a 44-year-old man from Tasmania was linked by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS), after vaccination with AstraZeneca. The man was a confirmed case of TTS. [9]

October lockdown

On 15 October Tasmania's southern region, including Hobart, went into a 3-day lockdown at 6 pm. This followed a man positive to the Delta variant of COVID-19 escaping from hotel quarantine and being in the community for around 18 hours before police located him the next day. The man did not co-operate in tracing his contacts. The 31-year-old from Albury in NSW flew from Melbourne to Hobart on 11 October, but did not have the correct border pass. He was taken to a quarantine hotel in Hobarts' CBD, and went missing on 12 October. He falsely stated to emergency management workers that he had been in Queensland the previous 14 days, when he had actually been in NSW. [10] [11]

The local government areas (LGA) affected were: Brighton Council, Central Highlands Council, City of Clarence, Derwent Valley Council, Glamorgan–Spring Bay Council, City of Glenorchy, City of Hobart, Huon Valley Council, Sorell Council, Southern Midlands Council, Tasman Council and Kingborough Council. As a result of the lockdown, The Unconformity arts festival due to start on 15 October in Queenstown was cancelled. [10]

The man who triggered the lockdown was sentenced for the COVID regulation breaches on 21 December to five months jail, two suspended, and backdated to the day he was taken into custody, 26 October. He was also fined $1,500. He received another five months jail, two suspended, for breaching a family violence order (FVO) by going to Tasmania to see the woman who held the FVO against him. [11]

December

On 15 December, Tasmania reopened its borders to travellers. Within four days, 7 cases of COVID-19 were detected, the first 3 of them were infected with the Omicron variant. [12]

By 19 December, over 95 per cent of eligible people in Tasmania had received one vaccination, over 90 per cent had received two. [12]

On 21 December 2021 Tasmania reintroduced a requirement to wear facemasks indoors. [12]

2022

On 20 January Tasmania had its first death since April 2020, raising total COVID deaths to 14. [13]

On 21 January another COVID related death occurred. [14]

On 24 January, there was 1 COVID-19 related death, raising the state total to 16. She was a 79-year-old woman who had underlying health conditions. There were 643 new cases, 35 hospitalised, 15 specifically for COVID-19 treatment. 3 in intensive care, 1 on a ventilator. [15]

On 25 January, there was 1 COVID-19 related death, raising the state total to 17. She was a 80-year-old woman. There were 712 new cases, 28 hospitalised, 11 specifically for COVID-19 treatment. 3 in intensive care. Active cases were at 5,094. [16]

By 30 January, there was another single COVID-19 related death, raising the state total to 18. She was a woman, in her late 80s, with underlying health conditions, at an aged care facility. There were 594 new cases to 8pm on 29 January, 20 hospitalised with COVID-19, 10 of those pecifically for COVID-19 treatment. Active cases were down at 4,978. [17]
In Tasmania:
• 95% aged 12 and over were fully vaccinated
• 46% aged between 5 and 11 years old had 1 dose of COVID-19 vaccine
• over 38% aged 18 and over had a booster dose [17]

On 2 February, there was a single COVID-19 related death, raising the state total to 19. It was 68-year-old man at an aged care facility. He had underlying medical condition and was in palliative care.There were 656 new cases to 8pm, 13 were hospitalised with COVID, 7 cases specifically for COVID-19 treatment, 2 of them on a ventilator. Active cases were down at 3,782 from 4,978 on 29 February. [18]

Event cancellations

Statistics

COVID-19 cumulative cases in Tasmania [30]

COVID-19 daily cases in Tasmania [30]

See also

Related Research Articles

North West Regional Hospital is the primary healthcare facility for the North Western region of Tasmania. Like the Mersey Community Hospital, it is operated by the Tasmanian Health Service - North West Region, which is part of the Tasmanian government's Department of Health and Human Services. It is located in Burnie together with the North West Private Hospital, which is part of Ramsay Health Care. It offers a full range of general care, and nuclear medicine service.

The Tasmanian AFL bid refers to several Australian rules football teams that have proposed to eventually join the Australian Football League (AFL) and the AFL Women's (AFLW). Proposals have been made on several occasions since the expansion of the Victorian Football League into an Australia-wide competition started in 1987.

The Taste of Tasmania is Tasmania's largest food and wine festival. Established in 1988, the Festival operates from 28 December–3 January and celebrated its 31st year in 2019. The festival is held in Hobart's Salamanca Place and waterfront precinct. The festival was run by the City of Hobart.

The Cygnet Folk Festival, run since 1982, is a three-day folk music festival held in Cygnet in Tasmania, Australia, that occurs annually on the second weekend in January.

The Unconformity is an arts festival held in Queenstown, Tasmania in Australia.

Dark Mofo Winter arts and music festival in Hobart, Tasmania

Dark Mofo is the winter version of the MONA FOMA festival, also held in Tasmania. With many of its events taking place at night, it celebrates the darkness of the southern winter solstice and features many musical acts, large scale light installations and a winter feast. Due to its pagan influence and darker themes, it has been aligned with the Tasmanian Gothic aesthetic in literature and art.

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References

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