ARCT-021

Last updated

ARCT-021
Vaccine description
Target SARS-CoV-2
Vaccine type mRNA
Clinical data
Other namesLUNAR-COV19
Routes of
administration
Intramuscular

ARCT-021, also known as LUNAR-COV19, is a COVID-19 vaccine candidate developed by Arcturus Therapeutics.

Contents

Medical uses

It requires the intramuscular injection with a single dose. [1]

Pharmacology

ARCT-021 is an mRNA vaccine. [2]

History

Arcturus Therapeutics partnered with Singapore's Duke–NUS Medical School to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. [3] The company also partnered with Catalent, a contract development and manufacturing organization, to manufacture multiple batches of Arcturus' COVID-19 mRNA vaccine candidate. [4]

Clinical trials

LUNAR-COV19 clinical trials in humans began in July 2020. [5] On 4 January 2021, Arcturus Therapeutics started Phase-2 clinical trials. [6]

Economics

Arcturus has entered into development and supply agreements with the Economic Development Board of Singapore and supply agreements with the Israel Ministry of Health for LUNAR-COV19. [7] [8]

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References

  1. "Arcturus Therapeutics Announces First Quarter 2021 Company Overview and Financial Results and Provides New Clinical Data". Businesswire. 10 May 2021. Retrieved 9 September 2021.
  2. "Arcturus Therapeutics Announces that it has Initiated Dosing of its COVID-19 STARR™ mRNA Vaccine Candidate, LUNAR-COV19 (ARCT-021) in a Phase 1/2 study". Globe Newswire. 11 August 2020.
  3. Teo J (15 April 2020). "Coronavirus: Clinical trials for Singapore's vaccine project could start in August". The Straits Times . Retrieved 27 April 2020.
  4. Stanton D (6 May 2020). "With Arcturus, Catalent bags another COVID project". Bioprocess Insider. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  5. Clinical trial number NCT04480957 for "Phase 1/2 Ascending Dose Study of Investigational SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine ARCT-021 in Healthy Adult Subjects" at ClinicalTrials.gov
  6. "Arcturus Therapeutics Receives FDA Allowance to Proceed with Phase 2 Study of ARCT-021 (LUNAR-COV19) Vaccine Candidate in the". Bloomberg. 4 January 2021. Retrieved 17 January 2021.
  7. Anwar N (26 November 2020). "Singapore's co-developed vaccine candidate is in 'good shape' for delivery in 2021". CNBC. Retrieved 18 March 2021.
  8. Cheok M, Mookerjee I (5 August 2020). "Singapore Will Get First Claim to Any Successful Arcturus Vaccine". Bloomberg. Retrieved 18 March 2021.