COVID-19 datasets

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COVID-19 datasets are public databases for sharing case data and medical information related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Contents

Aggregate statistics

United States

Volunteer/non-government

PublisherDate of first publicationIn official use?Update

Frequency

Geographic

Level

TimeseriesTesting

Sites

Testing

Number

CasesHospitalizationsDeathsVaccination

Sites

Vaccination

Number

Description
Coders Against COVID/GISCorps [1] March 22, 2020 [2] Yes, by FEMA [3] and State of California [4] DailyPoint (lat/long)YesYesNoNoNoNoYesNoA dataset of COVID-19 testing locations in the United States and Puerto Rico
USAFacts [5] April 24, 2020 [6] Yes, by CDC [7] DailyCountyYesNoNoYesYesNoNoA dataset of county-level coronavirus cases and deaths that is updated daily
COVID Tracking Project [8] March 7, 2020 [9] NoDailyStateYesNoYesYesYesYesNoNoA volunteer-run database of testing and medical stats in the United States
Sentiment Analysis of users reviews on COVID-19 contact tracing mobile applications [10] [11] March 2021This dataset is intended to support sentiment analysis of users' reviews on COVID-19 contact tracing mobile applications.

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

NameGeographic

Level

TimeseriesTesting

Sites

Testing

Number

CasesHospitalizationsDeathsVaccination

Sites

Vaccination

Number

COVID-19 Diagnostic Laboratory Testing (PCR Testing) Time Series Archived 2021-03-12 at the Wayback Machine StateYesNoYesNoNoNoNoNo
COVID-19 Reported Patient Impact and Hospital Capacity by Facility Archived 2021-03-12 at the Wayback Machine Point (lat/long)YesNoNoNoYesNoNoNo
COVID-19 Estimated Patient Impact and Hospital Capacity by State Archived 2021-03-12 at the Wayback Machine StateNoNoNoNoYesNoNoNo
COVID-19 Reported Patient Impact and Hospital Capacity by State Archived 2021-03-08 at the Wayback Machine StateNoNoNoNoYesNoNoNo
COVID-19 Reported Patient Impact and Hospital Capacity by State Timeseries Archived 2021-03-10 at the Wayback Machine StateYesNoNoNoYesNoNoNo

Global

Data hubs

Topic-specific and special-interest resources

Genomics

Imaging (Radiology)

Related Research Articles

GISAID Global initiative for sharing influenza virus data

GISAID is a global science initiative and primary source established in 2008 that provides open-access to genomic data of influenza viruses and the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. On January 10, 2020, the first whole-genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 were made available on GISAID, which enabled global responses to the pandemic, including the development of the first vaccines and diagnostic tests to detect SARS-CoV-2. GISAID facilitates genomic epidemiology and real-time surveillance to monitor the emergence of new COVID-19 viral strains across the planet.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 Virus that causes COVID-19

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‑CoV‑2), also known as the coronavirus, is the virus that causes COVID-19, the respiratory illness responsible for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The virus was previously referred to by its provisional name, 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), and has also been called human coronavirus 2019. First identified in the city of Wuhan, Hubei, China, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. SARS‑CoV‑2 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that is contagious in humans. As described by the US National Institutes of Health, it is the successor to SARS-CoV-1, the virus that caused the 2002–2004 SARS outbreak.

COVID-19 Contagious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a contagious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The first known case was identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. The disease has since spread worldwide, leading to an ongoing pandemic.

COVID-19 testing Diagnostic testing for SARS-CoV-2 virus infection

COVID-19 testing involves analyzing samples to assess the current or past presence of SARS-CoV-2. The two main branches detect either the presence of the virus or of antibodies produced in response to infection. Molecular tests for viral presence through its molecular components are used to diagnose individual cases and to allow public health authorities to trace and contain outbreaks. Antibody tests instead show whether someone once had the disease. They are less useful for diagnosing current infections because antibodies may not develop for weeks after infection. It is used to assess disease prevalence, which aids the estimation of the infection fatality rate.

COVID-19 pandemic in Oceania Ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Oceania

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached Oceania on 25 January 2020 with the first confirmed case reported in Melbourne, Australia. It has since spread elsewhere in the region, although many small Pacific island nations have thus far avoided the outbreak by closing their international borders. Three Oceania sovereign states and one dependency have yet to report a case. Australia and New Zealand were praised for their handling of the pandemic in comparison to other Western nations, with New Zealand and each state in Australia wiping out all community transmission of the virus several times even after re-introduction in the community.

COVID-19 pandemic in Arizona Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Arizona, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Arizona in January 2020. As of June 3, 2021 Arizona public health authorities reported 322 new cases of COVID-19 and five deaths, bringing the cumulative totals since the start of the pandemic to 882,691 cases and 17,653 deaths. 12.3% of the state's population has been positively diagnosed with COVID-19 since the first case was reported on January 26, 2020.

COVID-19 pandemic in North Carolina Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in North Carolina, United States

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of North Carolina on March 3, 2020.

Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on science and technology Effects or disruption to science, space and technology projects globally due to the COVID-19 pandemic economic shutdown

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected many scientific and technical institutions globally, resulting in lower productivity in a number of fields and programs. However, the impact of the pandemic has led to the opening of several new research funding lines for government agencies around the world.

COVID Tracking Project Collaborative online project aimed at tracking COVID-19 in the United States

The COVID Tracking Project was a collaborative volunteer-run effort to track the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. It maintained a daily-updated dataset of state-level information related to the outbreak, including counts of the number of cases, tests, hospitalizations, and deaths, the racial and ethnic demographic breakdowns of cases and deaths, and cases and deaths in long-term care facilities.

COVID-19 apps Mobile apps designed to aid contact tracing

COVID-19 apps are mobile software applications for digital contact tracing during the COVID-19 pandemic, i.e. the process of identifying persons ("contacts") who may have been in contact with an infected individual.

Statistics of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States Statistics relating to COVID-19 in the United States

The CDC publishes official numbers of COVID-19 cases in the United States.

SARS-CoV-2 Alpha variant Variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19

The Alpha variant, also known as lineage B.1.1.7, is a variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. One of several variants of concern, the variant is estimated to be 40–80% more transmissible than the wild-type SARS-CoV-2. It was first detected in November 2020 from a sample taken in September in the United Kingdom, and began to spread quickly by mid-December, around the same time as infections surged. This increase is thought to be at least partly because of one or more mutations in the virus' spike protein. The variant is also notable for having more mutations than normally seen.

Variants of SARS-CoV-2 Notable variants of SARS-CoV-2

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has many variants; some are believed, or have been believed, to be of particular importance due to their potential for increased transmissibility, increased virulence, or reduced effectiveness of vaccines against them.

Variant of concern Newly emerged variant of a virus with transmissibility and virulence that causes concerns

The term variant of concern (VOC) for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is a category used when mutations in Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) substantially increase binding affinity in RBD-hACE2 complex, while also being linked to rapid spread in human populations.

Various kinds of software have been developed and used for mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic. These include mobile apps for contact tracing and notifications about infection risks, digital passports verifying one's vaccination status, software for enabling – or improving the effectiveness of – lockdowns and social distancing in general, Web software for the creation of related information services, and software for the research and development for COVID-19 mitigation.

SARS-CoV-2 Iota variant Variant of the SARS-Cov-2 virus first identified in New York City

Iota variant, also known as lineage B.1.526, is one of the variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. It was first detected in New York City in November 2020. The variant has appeared with two notable mutations: the E484K spike mutation, which may help the virus evade antibodies, and the S477N mutation, which may help the virus bind more tightly to human cells.

SARS-CoV-2 Theta variant Variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus

Theta variant, also known as lineage P.3, is one of the variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The variant was first identified in the Philippines on February 18, 2021, when two mutations of concern were detected in Central Visayas. It was detected in Japan on March 12, 2021, when a traveler from the Philippines arrived at Narita International Airport in Tokyo.

SARS-CoV-2 Epsilon variant Variant of the SARS-Cov-2 virus

Epsilon variant, also known as CAL.20C and referring to two PANGO lineages B.1.427 and B.1.429, is one of the variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. It was first detected in California, USA in July 2020.

SARS-CoV-2 Eta variant Variant of the SARS-Cov-2 virus

The Eta variant is a variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The Eta variant or lineage B.1.525, also called VUI-21FEB-03 by Public Health England (PHE) and formerly known as UK1188, 21D or 20A/S:484K, does not carry the same N501Y mutation found in Alpha, Beta and Gamma, but carries the same E484K-mutation as found in the Gamma, Zeta, and Beta variants, and also carries the same ΔH69/ΔV70 deletion as found in Alpha, N439K variant and Y453F variant.

References

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