Tondano language

Last updated
Tondano
Native to Indonesia
RegionNortheast Sulawesi
Native speakers
(92,000 cited 1981) [1]
Latin
Language codes
ISO 639-3 tdn
Glottolog tond1251

Tondano (also known as Tolou, Tolour, Tondanou, and Toulour) is an Austronesian language spoken in the Tondano area of northeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. It is most similar to Tombulu and to Tonsea. [1]

Contents

Dialects

There are three main dialects of the Tondano language: Tondano proper, Kakas or Ka'kas, and Remboken. [2]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Tondano at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Sneddon 1975 , p. 1

Further reading