Watut language

Last updated
Watut
Native to Papua New Guinea
Region Watut River region
Native speakers
(3,200 cited 1988–2012) [1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 Variously:
una   North Watut
mpl   Middle Watut
mcy   South Watut
Glottolog watu1246 [2]

Watut is a language complex of Austronesian languages spoken in northern Papua New Guinea. Dialects include Maralinan, Silisili, Unank, Maralangko, and Danggal. It is spoken in Watut Rural LLG of Morobe Province.

Austronesian languages language family of Southeast Asia and the Pacific

The Austronesian languages are a language family widely spoken throughout Maritime Southeast Asia, Madagascar and the islands of the Pacific Ocean. There are also a few speakers in continental Asia. They are spoken by about 386 million people (4.9%). This makes it the fifth-largest language family by number of speakers. Major Austronesian languages include Malay, Javanese, and Filipino (Tagalog). The family contains 1,257 languages, which is the second most of any language family.

Papua New Guinea Constitutional monarchy in Oceania

Papua New Guinea, officially the Independent State of Papua New Guinea is a country in Oceania that occupies the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and its offshore islands in Melanesia, a region of the southwestern Pacific Ocean north of Australia. Its capital, located along its southeastern coast, is Port Moresby. The western half of New Guinea forms the Indonesian provinces of Papua and West Papua. It is the world's 3rd largest island country with 462,840 km2 (178,700 sq mi).

Watut Rural LLG is a local-level government (LLG) of Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea. The Watut language is spoken in the LLG.

Contents

Varieties

Watut varieties and their respective locations are: [3]

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References

  1. North Watut at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Middle Watut at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    South Watut at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Watut". Glottolog 3.0 . Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. Holzknecht, Susanne (1989). The Markham Languages of Papua New Guinea. Pacific Linguistics. ISBN   0-85883-394-8.

Further reading